CRA Tax Question: T5008. Divorce. Court Order.

In the process of managing the processing of 2 million tax slips for my employer, the world’s largest transfer agent, the following question came across my desk:

A husband and wife divorced during the year and the husband did not make his child support payments as required by court order.  As a result, family court here in Canada passed a judgement stating that any stock he held be removed from his name and either cashed in so those funds could be given to his wife, or the stock be transferred to his wife so that she may cash them in as she needs them.

So here is the question:

Who gets the T5008?  Him or her?

Note:  Traders or dealers in securities have to file a T5008 information return to report purchases of securities as principal for their own account, and sales of securities they make as an agent or nominee, for any vendor.

Issuers of securities and their agents or nominees use this (T5008) information return to report redemptions, acquisitions, or cancellations of securities.

Might this be considered a deemed disposition?

Deemed dispositions

You do not have to report deemed dispositions on a T5008 slip, in certain circumstances, the Income Tax Act considers that a property has been disposed of, even though no real compensation in the form of money or other consideration has been received.

Some examples of when a deemed disposition may occur are:

  • transfers of property to a trust;
  • gifts of property (that is, the name of the beneficial owner of the property is changed);
  • the owner dies; or
  • the owner ceases to be a resident of Canada.

In this guide, “sale” generally refers to a transaction where the ownership of property is transferred from one person or entity to another for a sum of money or other consideration. In the case of a deemed disposition, ownership of the property is not transferred for money or other consideration. In addition, a deemed disposition is not a purchase, redemption or cancellation of a security. Consequently, a deemed disposition is not considered for the purposes of Income Tax Regulation 230 and a T5008 slip is not required.

Answer to follow…

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Author: Warren Orlans

Welcome to inTAXicating. My name is Warren Orlans and this is my blog. With over 17-years experience in the taxation industry, 11 of them working for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and the rest working in the private sector at large financial institutions responsible for resolving tax issues for corporations and individuals and the Canadian lead for a large US bank on FATCA implementation. My tax career began pretty much out of university at the CRA, in Collections, where I moved up, across, over and up again through their division with stops in Enforcement, Taxpayer Relief (then Fairness), Audit, Directors Liability, Training, Mentoring, GST, GST/HST, Payroll, Corporate Tax, Personal tax, and probably much more. If you have a collections, compliance or audit issue with the CRA, MRQ, IRS or with the CRTC, WSIB or any aspect of those agencies, inTAXicating is the place you need to contact. inTAXicating has entered into a strategic partnership with Goldhar and Associates, to create Goldhar Tax Solutions. This partnership allows my team to include amazing tax lawyers, insolvency practitioners, mortgage brokers, debt counselling experts and much more. When dealing with governments, knowledge is power. We possess strong understanding of government so we know what the next step is before the government does. When you have a collections problem with the CRA, do you hire a graphic artist? No, you get a former collector who trained the staff, and who worked as a resource officer for 5 years. Then you know you are on the right track to resolving your tax problem(s). Others offer suggestions. We offer solutions! tax@goldhar.ca

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