IRS Releases 2011 Tax Rates

Below is the IRS press release identifying the 2011 Adjusted tax rates, effective January 1, 2011.

SECTION 1. PURPOSE
This revenue procedure sets forth inflation adjusted items for 2011. Other inflation adjusted items for 2011 are in Rev. Proc. 2010-40, 2010-46 I.R.B. 663 (dated November 15, 2010).

SECTION 2. 2011 ADJUSTED ITEMS
Tax Rate Tables.

For taxable years beginning in 2011, the tax rate tables under § 1 are as follows:
TABLE 1 – Section 1(a) – Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns and Surviving Spouses
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $17,000 10% of the taxable income
Over $17,000 but $1,700 plus 15% of
not over $69,000 the excess over $17,000
Over $69,000 but $9,500 plus 25% of
not over $139,350 the excess over $69,000
Over $139,350 but $27,087.50 plus 28% of
not over $212,300 the excess over $139,350
Over $212,300 but $47,513.50 plus 33% of
not over $379,150 the excess over $212,300
Over $379,150 $102,574 plus 35% of
the excess over $379,150

TABLE 2 – Section 1(b) – Heads of Households
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $12,150 10% of the taxable income
Over $12,150 but $1,215 plus 15% of
not over $46,250 the excess over $12,150
Over $46,250 but $6,330 plus 25% of
not over $119,400 the excess over $46,250
Over $119,400 but $24,617.50 plus 28% of
not over $193,350 the excess over $119,400
Over $193,350 but $45,323.50 plus 33% of
not over $379,150 the excess over $193,350
Over $379,150 $106,637.50 plus 35% of
the excess over $379,150

TABLE 3 – Section 1(c) – Unmarried Individuals (other than Surviving Spouses and Heads of Households)

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $8,500 10% of the taxable income
Over $8,500 but $850 plus 15% of
not over $34,500 the excess over $8,500
Over $34,500 but $4,750 plus 25% of
not over $83,600 the excess over $34,500
Over $83,600 but $17,025 plus 28% of
not over $174,400 the excess over $83,600
Over $174,400 but $42,449 plus 33% of
not over $379,150 the excess over $174,400
Over $379,150 $110,016.50 plus 35% of
the excess over $379,150

TABLE 4 – Section 1(d) – Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $8,500 10% of the taxable income
Over $8,500 but $850 plus 15% of
not over $34,500 the excess over $8,500
Over $34,500 but $4,750 plus 25% of
not over $69,675 the excess over $34,500
Over $69,675 but $13,543.75 plus 28% of
not over $106,150 the excess over $69,675
Over $106,150 but $23,756.75 plus 33% of
not over $189,575 the excess over $106,150
Over $189,575 $51,287 plus 35% of
the excess over $189,575

TABLE 5 – Section 1(e) – Estates and Trusts
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $2,300 15% of the taxable income
Over $2,300 but $345 plus 25% of
not over $5,450 the excess over $2,300
Over $5,450 but $1,132.50 plus 28% of
not over $8,300 the excess over $5,450
Over $8,300 but $1,930.50 plus 33% of
not over $11,350 the excess over $8,300
Over $11,350 $2,937 plus 35% of
the excess over $11,350

Child Tax Credit.

For taxable years beginning in 2011, the value used in § 24(d)(1)(B)(i) to determine the amount of credit under § 24 that may be refundable is $3,000.

Hope Scholarship, American Opportunity, and Lifetime Learning Credits.
(1) For taxable years beginning in 2011, the Hope Scholarship Credit under
§ 25A(b)(1), as increased under § 25A(i) (the American Opportunity Tax Credit), is an amount equal to 100 percent of qualified tuition and related expenses not in excess of $2,000 plus 25 percent of those expenses in excess of $2,000, but not in excess of $4,000. Accordingly, the maximum Hope Scholarship Credit allowable under § 25A(b)(1) for taxable years beginning in 2011 is $2,500.
(2) For taxable years beginning in 2011, a taxpayer’s modified adjusted gross income in excess of $80,000 ($160,000 for a joint return) is used to determine the reduction under § 25A(d)(2) in the amount of the Hope Scholarship Credit otherwise allowable under § 25A(a)(1). For taxable years beginning in 2011, a taxpayer’s modified adjusted gross income in excess of $51,000 ($102,000 for a joint return) is used to determine the reduction under § 25A(d)(2) in the amount of the Lifetime Learning Credit otherwise allowable under § 25A(a)(2).

Earned Income Credit.
(1) In general. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the following amounts are used to determine the earned income credit under § 32(b). The “earned income amount” is the amount of earned income at or above which the maximum amount of the earned income credit is allowed. The “threshold phaseout amount” is the amount of adjustedgross income (or, if greater, earned income) above which the maximum amount of the credit begins to phase out. The “completed phaseout amount” is the amount of adjusted gross income (or, if greater, earned income) at or above which no credit is allowed. The threshold phaseout amounts and the completed phaseout amounts shown in the table below for married taxpayers filing a joint return include the increase provided in § 32(b)(3)(B)(i), as adjusted for inflation for taxable years beginning in 2011.

Number of Qualifying Children
Item One Two Three or More None
Earned Income $9,100 $12,780 $12,780 $6,070
Amount
Maximum Amount of Credit $3,094 $5,112 $5,751 $464
Threshold Phaseout $16,690 $16,690 $16,690 $7,590
Amount (Single, Surviving Spouse, or Head of Household) Completed Phaseout $36,052 $40,964 $43,998 $13,660
Amount (Single, Surviving Spouse, or Head of Household) Threshold Phaseout $21,770 $21,770 $21,770 $12,670
Amount (Married Filing Jointly)Completed Phaseout $41,132 $46,044 $49,078 $18,740
Amount (Married Filing Jointly)
The instructions for the Form 1040 series provide tables showing the amount of the earned income credit for each type of taxpayer.
(2) Excessive investment income. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the earned income tax credit is not allowed under § 32(i) if the aggregate amount of certain investment income exceeds $3,150.

Standard Deduction.
(1) In general. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the standard deduction amounts under § 63(c)(2) are as follows:
Filing Status Standard Deduction
Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns $11,600
and Surviving Spouses (§ 1(a))
Heads of Households (§ 1(b)) $8,500
Unmarried Individuals (other than Surviving Spouses $5,800
and Heads of Households) (§ 1(c))
Married Individuals Filing Separate $5,800
Returns (§ 1(d))
(2) Dependent. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the standard deduction amount under § 63(c)(5) for an individual who may be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer cannot exceed the greater of (1) $950, or (2) the sum of $300 and the individual’s earned income.
(3) Aged or blind. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the additional standard deduction amount under § 63(f) for the aged or the blind is $1,150. These amounts are increased to $1,450 if the individual is also unmarried and not a surviving spouse.

Qualified Transportation Fringe. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the monthly limitation under § 132(f)(2)(A), regarding the aggregate fringe benefit exclusion amount for transportation in a commuter highway vehicle and any transit pass, and under
§ 132(f)(2)(B), regarding the fringe benefit exclusion amount for qualified parking, is $230.

Personal Exemption.
(1) Exemption amount. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the personal exemption amount under § 151(d) is $3,700.

Interest on Education Loans. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the $2,500 maximum deduction for interest paid on qualified education loans under § 221 begins to phase out under § 221(b)(2)(B) for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income in excess of $60,000 ($120,000 for joint returns), and is completely phased out for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of $75,000 or more ($150,000 or more for joint returns).

SECTION 3. EFFECTIVE DATE
This revenue procedure applies to taxable years beginning in 2011.

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Author: Warren Orlans

Welcome to the blog for Intaxicating Tax Services, www.intaxicating.ca. My name is Warren Orlans and I am the owner of inTAXicating Tax Services. With over 17-years experience in the taxation industry, 11 of them working for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and the rest working in the private sector at large financial institutions responsible for resolving tax issues for corporations and individuals and the Canadian lead for a large US bank on FATCA implementation. My tax career began pretty much out of university at the CRA, in Collections, where I moved up, across, over and up again through their division with stops in Enforcement, Taxpayer Relief (then Fairness), Audit, Directors Liability, Training, Mentoring, GST, GST/HST, Payroll, Corporate Tax, Personal tax, and probably much more. If you have a collections, compliance or audit issue with the CRA, MRQ, IRS or with the CRTC, WSIB or any aspect of those agencies, inTAXicating is the place you need to contact. inTAXicating Tax Services has strategic partnerships which allows my team to include amazing tax lawyers, insolvency practitioners, mortgage brokers, debt counselling experts and much more. When dealing with governments, knowledge is power. We possess strong understanding of government so we know what the next step is before the government does. When you have a collections problem with the CRA, do you hire a graphic artist? No, you get a former collector who trained the staff, and who worked as a resource officer for 5 years. Then you know you are on the right track to resolving your tax problem(s). Others offer suggestions. We offer solutions! info@intaxicating.ca

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