CRA releases New Forms for Treaty-Reduced Rates of Canadian Withholding Tax

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) recently released final versions of new forms, NR301, NR302 and NR303 which is to be provided by recipients of payments from Canadian residents to certify eligibility for treaty-reduced rates of Canadian withholding tax.

These Forms are not to be provided to the CRA, but rather to the Canadian resident payer of the withholdable amount or to certain intermediaries along a chain of payments subject to withholding.

Until recently, the CRA generally accepted reliance on the payee’s address for determining whether to apply a treaty rate. By releasing these forms, it signals that the CRA is requiring a greater level of diligence on the part of payers of withholdable amounts to be as sure as possible that the correct reduced treaty rate is applied.

Although the use of the Forms is not mandatory, and they will not guarantee avoidance of penalties, interest, or liabilities for underwithheld tax, many taxpayers will likely apply a 25% withholding rate on payments of withholdable amounts to recipients who do not complete the Forms.

The CRA is looking at the payor, to review the information provided by a non-resident on these forms, or in another format, and to make sure they have enough information to support that the non-resident is eligible for tax convention/treaty benefits on the income being paid.

In cases of inconstencies, the CRA is looking for intermediaries, prior to establishing a withholding tax rate, to question the information given and look at other information received from the non-resident, or known about the non-resident, if the payer knows or has reasonable cause to believe that the information on the form:
• is not correct or is misleading;
• contradicts information in the payer’s files; or
• is given without knowledge or consideration of the facts of a situation.

Forms are valid for the earlier of 2 years, or a change in the eligibility for convention benefits.

* Completing Form 301 is not mandatory. However, if a non-resident refuses to provide certification of beneficial ownership, residency, or eligibility for treaty benefits on request by a payer, the full statutory rate should be withheld.

One question that came up after the release of these forms was that they do not address holding global securities through CDS or DTC.

For some direction, you need to check the update to IC76-12, “Applicable Rate of Part XIII Tax on Amounts Paid or Credited to Persons in Countries with Which Canada Has a Tax Convention” related to Forms NR301, NR302, and NR303.

In this update, the CRA states that payments made to CDS on securities registered in the name of Cede & Co. (the nominee name for DTC) are made without tax. Tax will be withheld by CDS based on information received from DTC and collected by DTC’s participants.

I recommend you read the news release below to familiarize yourself with these forms.

The link to the release follows; http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/formspubs/frms/nr301-2-3-eng.html

Here are the forms;

Form NR301, Declaration of eligibility for benefits under a tax treaty for a non-resident taxpayer; http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pbg/tf/nr301/nr301-10e.pdf

Form NR302, Declaration of eligibility for benefits under a tax treaty for a partnership with non-resident partners; http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pbg/tf/nr302/nr302-10e.pdf

Form NR303, Declaration of eligibility for benefits under a tax treaty for a hybrid entity; http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pbg/tf/nr303/nr303-10e.pdf

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Author: Warren Orlans

Welcome to the blog for Intaxicating Tax Services, www.intaxicating.ca. My name is Warren Orlans and I am the owner of inTAXicating Tax Services. With over 17-years experience in the taxation industry, 11 of them working for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and the rest working in the private sector at large financial institutions responsible for resolving tax issues for corporations and individuals and the Canadian lead for a large US bank on FATCA implementation. My tax career began pretty much out of university at the CRA, in Collections, where I moved up, across, over and up again through their division with stops in Enforcement, Taxpayer Relief (then Fairness), Audit, Directors Liability, Training, Mentoring, GST, GST/HST, Payroll, Corporate Tax, Personal tax, and probably much more. If you have a collections, compliance or audit issue with the CRA, MRQ, IRS or with the CRTC, WSIB or any aspect of those agencies, inTAXicating is the place you need to contact. inTAXicating Tax Services has strategic partnerships which allows my team to include amazing tax lawyers, insolvency practitioners, mortgage brokers, debt counselling experts and much more. When dealing with governments, knowledge is power. We possess strong understanding of government so we know what the next step is before the government does. When you have a collections problem with the CRA, do you hire a graphic artist? No, you get a former collector who trained the staff, and who worked as a resource officer for 5 years. Then you know you are on the right track to resolving your tax problem(s). Others offer suggestions. We offer solutions! info@intaxicating.ca

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