The Horse and Pony Protection Association (HAPPA) Sought Voluntary Revocation of Charitable Status From CRA

The voluntary revocation of the registered charitable status of The Horse and Pony Protection Association (HAPPA) as a result of a CBC investigation could leave Canadian Taxpayers who donated to this organization owing back monies to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

Almost one year ago, the CBC Investigates reported on accountability issues at the Newfoundland charity after former members of the Board of Directors raised concerns about the operation of the group, which at the time continued to take donations from the public 18 months after closing its flagship horse sanctuary.

As a result of strict confidentiality guidelines, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) are unable to say who made the request to have HAPPA’s charitable status removed, however after the CBC investigation was published, the website was removed, and further investigation turned up a significant breach in reporting requirements on behalf of the charity as it would appear that they filed incorrect information with federal charity regulators, claiming that all board members are “arm’s length” from each other.

According to the CBC, the only current active members of the Horse and Pony Protection Association (HAPPA) board are what appear to be a mother and daughter and what appear to be a long-time couple.

Family members and common-law partners are considered “not at arm’s length” by the Canada Revenue Agency — something that can affect how the agency assesses a charity’s status.

Charities are required to file a form outlining those relationships and the CBC reported that on HAPPA’s website they found their filing for the year ending December 31st, 2011 in which there were 8 directors listed as being “at arm’s length” from each other.

The significance of the revocation of charitable status is that anyone who donated to the charity after that date, will not be allowed to claim the donation as a deduction from their income. If they do so anyway, the CRA will re-assess them plus penalties and interest. The Taxpayer Relief program will not granted penalty and or interest relief to those who donated to this charity, and in situations like these, as there are no categories to apply under.

Once the revoked, the charity should have transferred all of its remaining property — including cash — to an eligible donee, or be subjected to a revocation tax equal to the property’s full value.

If you have donated to this organization and are concerned that the CRA may disallow the charitable receipt, it is best to not submit it with your taxes. You have 4 years to claim charitable deductions.

November 14, 2014 National Philanthropy Day in Canada: Highlighting Tax Breaks for Charitable Donations

November 14th, 2014 is National Philanthropy Day here in Canada, and the Honourable Kerry-Lynne D. Findlay, P.C., Q.C., M.P., Minister of National Revenue, was in Vancouver to applaud those Canadians who donate to charities and to remind Canadians to take advantage of the tax credits available for eligible charitable donations.

Receiving special attention was the new temporary donor super tax credit which provides an extra 25% federal tax credit on top of the original charitable donation tax credit which means that eligible first-time donors can get a 40% federal tax credit for monetary donations of $200 or less, and a 54% federal tax credit for the portion of donations that are over $200 up to a maximum of $1,000.

The donor super credit applies to donations made after March 20, 2013, and can only be claimed once between 2013 and 2017.

This is in addition to the provincial credits available.donation

Those who have donated before can still be eligible for the charitable donation tax credit, a non-refundable tax credit which allows taxpayers to claim eligible amounts of gifts to a limit of 75% of their net income.

For a quick estimate of your charitable tax credit for the current tax year, try the charitable donation tax credit calculator, which can be found here.

Minister Findlay also reminded Canadians that only Canadian registered charities and other qualified donees can issue official donation tax receipts.  This is extremely important because if you make a donation to a charity which is not eligible to issue donation tax receipts but they provide one anyways, the CRA will re-assess you for that donation deduction with penalties and interest.  A little due diligence up front goes a very long way.

If it seems too good to be true, it should give you reason for concern…

To find out if an organization is registered, go to the Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) website and search their complete list of registered charities in their Charities Listings.

For more information about donating, such as how to calculate and claim the charitable tax credit, go to the CRA’s site for making donations, which is here.

 

Some Quick Facts

  • Two years ago, Canada became the first country in the world to officially recognize November 15 as National Philanthropy Day.
  • There are more than 85,000 registered charities in Canada.
  • The benefit to charities of being a registered charity? Registration provides charities with exemption from income tax.
  • According to Statistics Canada, in 2010 almost half of all Canadians volunteered, giving more than two billion hours of their time. In addition, in 2012, 5.6 million tax filers reported charitable donations for a total of $8.3 billion in donations reported.
  • According to Statistics Canada, in 2012 the average age of charitable donors across the provinces and territories is 53 years old.
  • Follow the CRA on Twitter – @CanRevAgency
  • Follow inTAXicating on Twitter @intaxicating

 

Double Nomination for inTAXicating in 2014: Canadian Weblog Awards.

I understand that inTAXicating has been nominated twice in the 2014 Canadian Weblog Awards in the Business and Career category and for the Lifetime achievement award which means the blog has been around since 2009.

What I like about the Canadian Weblog Awards is that they are a juried competition (I was a juror 2-years ago) because they celebrate quality over popularity. It’s not traffic numbers that matter, but also great writing and great design.

The awards really do show off the best and brightest bloggers in Canada and it’s amazing how big these awards get year after year.  I feel like the award should be called the Schmutzie in honour of the creator and operator of these awards (and a pretty awesome blogger), Elan Morgan aka Schmutzie.

Best of luck to all nominees!