Are Acronyms or Emojis Ever Acceptable for Business Communication

Are acronyms acceptable in a business environment?

The general rule is this: If a customer / client sends you correspondence with acronyms, or emoji’s, it means one of 3 things;

  1. They are young… Very young.
  2. They don’t know how to communicate on a business level which might be an indicator of immaturity, or a genuine lack of understanding of how to communicate with someone that you are conducting business with.
  3. Or they just don’t care.

The communication going the other way should not include acronyms unless the acronym is a generally used and commonly understood short form for a professional organization or term used in finance / your industry.

Emoji’s… Never.  Ever.

But…

There are, however, some exceptions, but they are few and far between.

Imagine telling a friend in an email that you overheard a conversation and that you were “SMH”.  SMH means “shaking my head”.  Your friend saves that email, then down the road wants to introduce you to someone, or refer someone to you, and flips your email out and the person who you were shaking you head at is that person, related to that person, or is best buds with that person.

It might seem small, but it’s not.

The same holds true for people in business who send out emails without taking the time to edit them for punctuation, or spelling, or grammar.  I am certainly not saying that each and every email has to be perfect, but it reflects on you, the time you spend gathers the facts and it tells the person receiving the email that you don’t think enough about them to take the time and ensure that it makes sense and it clear.

If you’re asking for information, make sure that is clear.

If you’re looking for it back by a certain time, make sure that is clear.

If you want to get to the point and are comfortable sending an email demanding something right away, then don’t be surprised if you find that business relationship to be a little cold.  Common sense should tell you that everyone likes to be asked in a respectful manner and given more than a second to provide a response.

Getting back to acronyms, here are some of the acceptable acronyms:

ASAP – As soon as possible.

NSFW – Not safe for work.

These are okay, but not recommended.

FYI – For your information – can be used – but make sure that you know what that means.  Generally it means, this is for you (the receiver of the email) and you can do with the information what you please).

FYI Only.  This means, this email is for you, but do not share it with anyone!  Sharing it could cause huge problems, usually for the personal who wrote or forwarded the email.

Here are some other Business terms you might see used.

Accounting:

DR – debit

CR – Credit

ROI – Return on Investment

CRA – Canada Revenue Agency

IRS – Internal Revenue Service

ITC – Input Tax Credit

GST – Goods and Services Tax

PST – Provincial Sales Tax

HST – Harmonized Sales Tax (both the Provincial tax and the Goods and Services Tax)

VAT – Value Added Tax (like the GST/HST)

WSIB – Workplace Safety and Insurance Board

ITA – Income Tax Act

ETA – Excise Tax Act

BIA – Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act

CY – Current Year

PY – Previous Year

 

Network-related Acronyms

FB – Facebook

IG – Instagram

LI – LinkedIn

YT – YouTube

SC – Snapchat

WP – Word Press

While there is no short form for Twitter, there are some Twitter-related short forms that are often used in more mainstream communications nowadays, such as:

DM – Direct Message

MT – Modified Tweet (Used when re-sharing a Tweet where you alter the text by shortening it to fit within the character limit or removing the  poster’s handle if they have a private account).

PM – Private Message – When someone PM’s you in Twitter, they send a private message to you that no one else can see.

RT – Retweet – When you publish somebody else’s Tweet, in its entirety, to your own feed.

Internally, business units tend to use their own terminology when discussing internal matters.  For example,

B2B – Business to Business – Refers to companies who sell to other companies.

B2C – Business to Consumer – Refers to businesses who sell directly to individuals.

CMS – Content Management Systems are a tool used for editing, scheduling and publishing any written material for the web.

CPC – Cost per Click – the dollar amount an an advertiser pays for every person who clicks on an ad.

CR – Conversion Rate – The conversion rate is the number of people who take an action divided by the number who could have.

CTA (also C2A) – Call to Action – A statement that asks the reader to do something.

KPI – Key Performance Indicators – A metric used to measure success in achieving goals, ie/ measurement of engagement, conversions, shares or clicks, etc.

PV – Page Views

UGC – User Generated Content – content created in order to generate views, comments, etc.

IT – Information Technology

 

Internal Acronyms to get you through an email with your IT Department

ESP – Email Service Provider

ISP – Internet Service Provider

HTML – Hyper Text Markup Language

RSS – Really Simple Syndication

SEO – Search Engine Optimization

API: An “application programming interface” is a set of rules for how pieces of software interact. Your social media management tools use the APIs of Facebook, Twitter and the other networks to post and schedule.

SEM – Search Engine Marketing – How businesses leverage search engines for marketing purposes.

TOS – Terms Of Service

UI – User Interface

 

Taxation

NOA – Notice of Assessment

LFP – Late Filing Penalties

LRP – Late Remitting Penalties

P&I – Penalties and Interest

TPR – Taxpayer Relief

VDP – Voluntary Disclosure Program

T1 – Personal tax return (Individual)

T2 – Corporate Tax Return

RP – Payroll Accounts

RT – GST/HST Accounts

Are there other terms which are commonly used in your field of business which you could add to the list, or do you have any stories of odd or unusual acronyms or emojis you have been sent.  If so, please share the stories below.

 

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Author: Warren Orlans

Welcome to inTAXicating. My name is Warren Orlans and this is my blog. With over 17-years experience in the taxation industry, 11 of them working for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and the rest working in the private sector at large financial institutions responsible for resolving tax issues for corporations and individuals and the Canadian lead for a large US bank on FATCA implementation. My tax career began pretty much out of university at the CRA, in Collections, where I moved up, across, over and up again through their division with stops in Enforcement, Taxpayer Relief (then Fairness), Audit, Directors Liability, Training, Mentoring, GST, GST/HST, Payroll, Corporate Tax, Personal tax, and probably much more. If you have a collections, compliance or audit issue with the CRA, inTAXicating is the place you need to contact. inTAXicating works in strategic partnership with amazing tax lawyers, insolvency practitioners, mortgage brokers, debt counselling experts and much more. When dealing with governments, knowledge is power. We possess strong understanding of government so we know what the next step is before the government does. When you have a collections problem with the CRA, do you hire a graphic artist? No, you get a former collector who trained the staff, and who worked as a resource officer for 5 years. Then you know you are on the right track to resolving your tax problem(s). Others offer suggestions. We offer solutions! info@intaxicating.ca

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