Get Ready to File your Personal Income Tax Return (T1). Make Sure You Have All Your Slips Accounted For!

Are you getting ready to file your Personal Tax (T1) Return here in Canada to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)?

Are you chomping at the bit to get your refund?

Before you push forward and get that return in, make sure to check that you have received all the tax slips you should be getting?

Then check again.

If you forget a tax slip – T3, T5, T4, T4A, etc – the CRA does not accept the argument that you just “forgot it”, but rather they believe that you have willingly omitted the slip in order to reduce the amount of income that you are reporting, so you end up paying less taxes.

The penalty for missing slips can be quite steep.

Forget to include slips year over year and the penalty increases.

At inTAXicating, we encourage our clients to keep track of slips expected and slips received through a spreadsheet based on the slips received in the previous year, and any transactions in the current year which will result in the generating of a tax slip.

In the inTAXicating Personal Tax Spreadsheet, we go further by identifying which member of the family the slip belongs to, when it was received the previous year and which institution produced the slip.

Remember that slips produced by institutions are also sent to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) so they know what you should be filing before you do unless you keep track.

Then take this list, and staple it to a box or file folder which is kept in the house / place of business for all potential tax-related materials for the year.  At tax time, it’s an easy checklist to make sure all is in order and that when filing, everything is included.

If, however, you have forgotten to include a slip, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) will eventually use their copy of the slip notify and re-assess you if you have not had the time to amend your return.

If you don’t get to the CRA first, the next thing you know, you likely will have a balance owing and along with the penalty for missing the slip, the debt is accruing interest.  It can easily escalate from there!

A little organization will reduce the amount of penalties and interest paid to the CRA.  As the Tax Manager for Computershare Trust Company of Canada / Computershare Investor Services, I was responsible for the preparation, filing and submission of tax slips to the millions of investors Computershare kept track of, so I understand more than anyone the importance of getting slips out to the holders on time, and accurately, and then to the government on time and without penalty.

So here is a copy of my list of slips, their mailing date from the provider.

RRSP – If you were one of the many who used the March 1st deadline to make your contribution for the previous year, then you would be receiving that slips beginning March 15th.  All other RRSP contributions which were made prior to the 60-day extended period saw their tax slips mailed beginning at the turn of the calendar.  They are T4RSP slips and RL2’s for residents of Quebec.

T5 / RL3 and NR4’s begin to get mailed around January 15th.

T4RIF / RL2 withdrawals from a RRIF, are mailed the 3rd week of February.

T5/RL3 for investment interest income coming from a mutual fund are mailed the 3rd week of February.

T3 / RL16 reporting dividend income from mutual funds are mailed by the 3rd week of February.

Receipt of contribution from an estate rolling over funds to a spouse produce a T4RSP / T4RIF / RL2 – issued for receipt of contributions from an estate rolling over funds to a spouse – sent  out the first week in February

T4A / RL1 are issued for RESP withdrawals and are produced and mailed the first week in February.

NR4’s showing income for non-residents of Canada are mailed the 3rd week in February.

If during the year you received Employment Insurance (EI), Old Age Security (OAS) or Canada Pension Plan (CPP) payments, you can follow this 3-step process from the government website to make sure everything is in order and get your tax slips online directly from Service Canada.

Happy filing.

inTAXicating Tax Services for all your tax needs and specializing in providing solutions to your tax problems.

info@intaxicating.ca

 

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Why Getting the Largest Tax Refund Possible from the CRA is NOT a Good Idea

After spending close to 11-years working in the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), I have a very good idea what gets people into tax trouble.

Okay, I know exactly what gets people into tax trouble, and while it’s nearly impossible to list them all, I can tell you that there are ways to get out of tax trouble which many have never considered.

I also know that getting a refund back from the CRA isn’t always a good idea.  More on that later.

I can honestly say, without any prejudice that the main problem has to do with firms advertising at tax time about getting the most money in the fastest way possible.  These ads are aimed at people who equate getting their money back fast through the quick, cheap filing of tax returns.

The ads go something like this;

“Get the Largest Tax Refund Possible”.

“Get the Most Back.”

“Get the Most You Are Entitled To.”

“Get your Money Back Now!”

Just hearing those advertising slogans scare me, and it should scare you too.

Getting money back from the government at tax time, does not mean what you might think it does.

You are not getting money from the government because you fell into a threshold, but what you are doing is getting your money back from the government.

Your money that you overpaid (or were over-deducted at source) which the government kept during the year – held interest-free in fact – which you are asking for back.

Amazing.

It’s akin to lending someone money for a year – they use it, or invest it and make money off of it – and then a year later you ask for it back and you get it, while they made money off of it.

So how does this tied into tax debt?

History has shown me that people do not wake up in the morning and decide that they want to start carrying a balance owing to the Canada Revenue Agency.  Nobody wants to worry when they go to use their debit card that there might not be funds there as a result of a CRA bank garnishment, or when they go to sell their home find out that there is a lien on it.

Tax problem occur over time and as the time passes and interest accumulates, people find their ability to deal with it declines and before you know it, the amount owing is massive and the CRA is breathing down your neck.

So imagine if after rushing to have your tax return completed – so you can get back a couple of hundred dollars – you find out that you owed money instead.  Now you have a tax problem.  A tax problem that you have not budgeted for.  Now in collections, you have time find a way to pay off this amount owing, and fast, before the CRA takes legal actions.  You can ask friends and family for money, or consider a second job to pay that off.  It can be done, it can take time, or it can snowball and you become a chronic tax debtor in the eyes of the CRA.

Now the fun starts.  Visits to your house, your employer and notices to your bank or clients all run the risk of causing you long-term embarrassment.

If only there was a solution available to help out the repayment.

Well, there is.

This scenario could be completely different if you have taken the time to speak with an accountant, or a reputable tax firm and knew in advance that you might owe and together you had the opportunity to determine the best way to handle this impeding debt by placing money into your RRSP, or applying for, and claiming deductions to reduce your amount of taxes owing at year-end.  With a good accountant, your tax planning is not just for the current year, but also for future years.  

Wouldn’t that make more sense?

One of the first questions I ask a prospective client, or anyone who comes to me for tax advice, is who completed your tax return and what are their credentials.  It’s important because I have taken tax returns which owed the CRA $3000, $4000 or $5000 each year and turned them in to $4000 and $5000 credit returns just by claiming deductions and tax credits available to those taxpayers which their tax preparation service either didn’t know about or didn’t care about.  You only get so much service for $50.

There is nothing illegal in doing that, and provided that there is legitimate supporting documentation, the CRA wouldn’t reject the claim.

So instead of rushing to have your return completed for $40 or $50, think about spending the extra money this year and take advantage of an accounting firm which will sit with you, determine how to minimize your tax expenditures for this year and for future years.

Pay what you owe and not a cent more, and if you’re getting money back every year find out why.  Learn which deductions you may be eligible for and start keeping your receipts.

Take control of your year-end tax filing and stop sending the CRA penalty and interest revenue.

If you already have a tax problem, you need to have tax experts review your prior year tax returns to look for missed deductions and credits.  With a simple amending of the return, your balance could be reduced or wiped out completely.  This really is the best way to start resolving your tax problem.

It’s what I do.  For you.

It’s worth the money!

If you are looking for an alternative, some assistance, or have tax questions, contact us at info@intaxicating.ca and let’s get the ball rolling.