Beneficial Owner – CRA Clarification

Beneficial owner – Regarding proper amount of withholding, the CRA bases it on name of address, UNLESS, there is a “care of” address or the mailing address and permanent address are different.  If there is a care of address, or difference in permanent address, the CRA requires a certificate to be completed by the holder. 

“In any doubtful case, a certificate, as described in ¶ 5(b), is required to be completed and forwarded to the payer by the payee in order that a lower rate of withholding tax, in accordance with a tax convention, can be applied. Otherwise the 25% rate will apply.

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) will accept the payee as beneficial owner of amounts paid to non-residents if the payee is an insurance corporation or pension trust that invests solely on its own behalf and includes such amounts in computing its revenue.”

Examples of the certificates are available in this CRA Information circular, pages 2 and 3.  http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pub/tp/ic76-12r6/ic76-12r6-e.pdf

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CRA to finally accept payments via Interac Online

Monday 5 October 2009

 

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has integrated Interac Online, an internet payment method which enables Canadians to make income tax payments directly from their bank accounts, without disclosing personal financial data.

As a result of the initiative, starting October 5th 2009, taxpayers and businesses will be able to pay online for various types of taxes, including income taxes, corporate taxes, payroll taxes, and GST, as well as make one-time payments and instalments.  Interac Online works with existing online banking services of participating Canadian financial institutions.

Public Works and Government Services Canada, which establishes banking services for the Government of Canada, has made it possible for the CRA to implement this new service.

Finally!

CRA Filing changes coming down the pipe… Potentially…

A couple items are coming down the pipeline at the CRA – so say my sources in Headquarters in Ottawa.  Since They are a couple years off at best, here are the main 2 which will have a significant impact on the general public, especially in industries where there is a lot of filing of slips and returns to be done. 

These items were announced in the 2009 budget on January 27, 2009.

1) Mandatory Electronic Filing for Information Returns – The CRA is tired of getting paper, loads and loads of paper which they then haev to key into their systems which is why they began converting systems about 10 years ago, so they could accomodate the vast amounts of informatin tehy expect to be receiving electronically.

Yes, a lot can be filed with the CRA electronically, on CD rom, or directly through the website, but going forward the CRA will charge a penalty to those filing in any way other than electronically through their website or via XML filing.  A smart move!

2) The CRA is in the process of developing a Canadian equivalent to the US W8 / W9 forms which require residents and non-residets of the US o complete valid forms and submit them to transfer agents in order to qualify for a reduced amount of tax withholding, if applicable. 

From what I’m told these forms will go hand in hand with the NR4 form and will be a Canadian version, so light on the requirements for now, but used by the CRA going forward.    Actually, my sources tell me that these forms will only need to be completed by people whose actual residential address is unknown since the CRA uses that address (domicile) for determining the treaty rate.

Sounds like good times are coming…  Tell you friends.

IRS Qualified Intermediary (QI) – Know Your Client Rules

Logo of the Internal Revenue Service
Logo of the Internal Revenue Service (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

List of Approved Know-Your-Client Rules

Revenue Procedure 2000-12 states that the IRS will not enter into a qualified intermediary (QI) withholding agreement that provides for the use of documentary evidence obtained under a country’s know-your-customer rules if it has not received the know-your-customer practices and procedures for opening accounts and responses to 18 specific questions listed in the revenue procedure.This document lists those countries that have submitted know-your-customer rules and those rules have been approved.The QI agreement contains an attachment that lists the specific types of know-your-customer documentary evidence for each country that is sufficient for purposes of the QI.  The IRS is working together with the organizations that have submitted acceptable know-your-customer rules to develop standardized attachments.  The attachments can be seen here as soon as they are available.

If a country is on the approved list, entities and branches located in that country may submit their QI applications. Once a specific attachment has been developed for a particular country, the IRS will associate the attachment with the QI agreement it sends for signature. A QI may suggest amendments to the attachment, but departures from the standardized attachment may delay processing of an application.

To determine whether the know-your-customer rules that have been submitted to the IRS cover a particular QI applicant, the applicant should look to the specific country attachment. For example, in some countries, different rules apply to banks and brokers. A QI applicant that is a bank or a broker should verify that the know-your-customer rules that have been submitted cover all the rules applicable to that applicant.

For a list of countries, follow this URL: http://www.irs.gov/businesses/international/article/0,,id=96618,00.html

In-TAX-icating

In-TAX-icating.

Definition:

a: To excite or stupefy by taxation to the point where physical and mental control is markedly diminished

b: to excite or elate to the point of enthusiasm or frenzy… about taxation.

Passionate about Taxation.  Passionate about helping you!

Could a Canadian FATCA be in the works?

Since this case broke in February, governments around the world have been investigating the possibility that their citizens have offshore accounts set up mainly to avoid paying taxes.  Germany, which as of late 2008, is leading the international crackdown on tax evaders, has reportedly collected up to 250 million euros from more than 200 tax evaders who have turned themselves in, and  from 330 citizens who wrongly believed they were on the list of accounts stolen from LGT Group (the largest family-owned private wealth and asset manager in Europe, owned by the Prince of Liechtenstein and thought by many to be the factor behind the US crackdown on tax evasion through their FATCA legislation.

When prompted for a comment regarding Canadians, the CRA refuses to comment.

The CRA would not even throw the press a bone by offering how many Canadians are involved, if the CRA is investigating, and if the CRA would accept voluntary disclosure from those involved in order to help them come clean without the fear of penalties and / or prosecution.

One can wonder if the silence is a result of a crack team of CRA staff who have known about and are working on resolving the Canadians attached to this list, or whether this whole situation came out of left field and the CRA is scrambling to get more information before they can respond publicly.

For those of you who are unaware, this came to light when in February when a former LGT computer technician name Heinrich Kieber stole and sold account information of about 1,400 wealthy clients to the German foreign intelligence service, the Bundesnachrichtendienst.  Germany then shared the data with other countries which triggered an international crackdown on tax evasion.

Kieber, for his part, has been given a new identity and placed in witness protection in an undisclosed country.  During a hearing in the US, surrounding US citizens’ use of banks in Liechtenstein and Switzerland, Kieber answered questions and outlined the extensive efforts and schemes enlisted by the bank to ensure secrecy.

Swiss banks will now refuse to hold offshore money from US citizens and the US plans on suing the bank.  This is just the beginning!

Should Canada follow the lead of other countries investigating their citizens who have accounts in Liechtenstein?   Those countries have made public the number of people who have stepped forward and declared their offshore income.  Is there is reason why Canada remains quiet?

Only time will tell.