Insolvent or in Tax Trouble? Don’t Let the CRA Decide.

Shedthedebt.ca Goldhar and Associates.

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Insolvent or Tax Troubles?  Don’t Let the CRA Decide!

In my experiences which includes almost 11-years working in the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), you should never allow the CRA to decide whether you can fix your tax problems or whether you should go bankrupt.

From the stand-point of a CRA Collections officer, going bankrupt is great because it removes the account from their inventory of accounts to collect / resolve.

Your file disappears from their inventory and re-appears in the CRA’s Insolvency Unit inventory.

From the perspective of the Collections Department, it’s case closed!

There are 3 ways a CRA Collections Office resolves one of their accounts;

1) Collect it / fix the compliance issue(s)

2) Write it off because they cannot collect it

3) Move the account to the Insolvency unit

Go Bankrupt!

The CRA’s Collections Officers are not allowed to tell you to go bankrupt. In fact, they…

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CRA’s Offshore Informant Leads Line Succeeding

A vast majority of Canadians pay their fair share of taxes, but those who don’t put an increased burden on the rest of us. That is why the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has implemented initiatives to help Canadians participate in the efforts to help fight offshore tax avoidance and evasion. The Offshore Tax Informant Program…

via Federal programs in place to address offshore tax avoidance and evasion — National Post – Top Stories

Changes to the CRA’s RC59 Business Consent Form (For Online Access) Coming in May 2017

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has announced on their website that there are changes coming to the RC59 Business Consent form.  This form is completed by a taxpayer who has business accounts or by businesses who wish to have a representative contact the CRA on their behalf.

Without having this form signed and dated, the CRA will not speak to the representative.

These changes are expected to be law in May of 2017.

These laws apply to representatives who use the RC59, Business Consent, to get online access to their business clients’ information in Represent a Client.

  1. After May 15, to request online access to tax information for a business, you will need to complete the authorization request in Represent a Client. Form RC59 will no longer be used to authorize online access.

    To complete an authorization request:

    1. Log into Represent a Client.
    2. From the Welcome page, select “Review and update.”
    3. Select “Authorization request” at the bottom of the “Manage clients” tab and follow the instructions.
    4. Print the signature page for your client to sign.

    Scan and send the signed copy of the signature page to the CRA using Submit documents.

  2. When you use Represent a Client, you’ll have access to your business clients’ information in five days or less instead of the 15 days it takes today with form RC59.
    You can also see which business clients have authorized you and if the authorizations expire by selecting “Businesses that have authorized this business (or RepID)” under the “Manage clients” tab.
  3. What if I don’t use Represent a Client?
    If you still prefer your current process, you can still use form RC59 to request access to your business clients’ information by telephone or mail.

 

How do I correct or dispute inaccuracies on my credit file?


I get lots of questions related to Credit Bureaus and items which show up well after they have been paid or which do not belong on there at all.

Having worked for Equifax many, many years ago right after I started working for the CRA and they release all the temporary staff for an 11-month period due to budget cuts, I can proudly say that Equifax makes it very easy to communicate with them regarding any such issues.

It’s all laid out on their website, but I provided a summary here:

Complete and submit a Consumer Credit Report Update Form to Equifax.

It is necessary to specify what information is incorrect or what information does not belong to you.

Equifax will verify that information afterwards as part of their investigation.

You will need to include photocopies of all necessary documents and identification to update your personal Credit Report (Ex: receipts, legal documents, 2 photocopies of pieces of valid identification, including proof of current address)

Fax the request to them at:

Fax: (514) 355-8502

Your request will be processed within 10 to 15 business days. After this period has elapsed, a confirmation letter will be sent to your mailing address.

OR

By Mail:

Equifax Canada Co.
Consumer Relations Department
P.O. Box 190, Station Jean-Talon,
Montreal, Quebec H1S 2Z2

Your request will be processed within 15 to 20 business days . After this period has elapsed, a confirmation letter will be sent to your mailing address.

Equifax will verify the necessary information and mail you a confirmation.

 

Could it be any easier than that?!?

 

Guest Post Thursday: Knowledge First Financial

Knowledge First Financial urges parents to apply for BCTESG

1 in 5 BC children have received the $1,200 education grant

Approximately 80% of eligible children have yet to receive the $1,200 British Columbia Education Savings Grant. Knowledge First Financial, a Canadian RESP Provider, is urging parents to apply now and enjoy all the benefits of an RESP including compound, tax-free growth and the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) of up to $7,200. That means up to $8,400 of ‘free’ money for each child to help pay for post-secondary education for BC parents.

More than ever, post-secondary students have more freedom to choose programs and schools, more time to focus on studies and explore new opportunities, less stress and less debt thanks to the savings accrued from RESPs. Knowledge First Financial supports students in their post-secondary studies – in fact, when the BCTESG was introduced in 2015, Knowledge First Financial was one of the first RESP providers to support it.

If you’re the parent of a child born in BC in 2006 or later, here are three things to know about BCTESG:

 

What is BCTESG?

The British Columbia Training and Education Savings Grant is a $1,200 grant for post-secondary education established in 2015. To be eligible, parents or guardians and children must be residents of BC, and possess a Social Insurance Number.

How do I apply?

Firstly, you will need a RESP from a provider who can access the BCTESG – a sales representative from Knowledge Financial First can help set this up for you. You will be asked for proof of residency, such as a driver’s license, BCID card, BC Service Cards or a recent utility bill upon application.

When do I apply?

You can apply for BCTESG as soon as your child turns six up until the day before your child’s ninth birthday, however Knowledge First Financial recommends that parents apply as soon as possible. Deadlines for children born before August 15, 2009 are slightly different:

  • Children born in 2006: Apply between August 15, 2016 and August 14, 2019
  • Children born in 2007, 2008, before August 15, 2009: Apply between August 15, 2015 and August 14, 2018

 

Source: http://www.esdc.gc.ca/en/reports/resp_promoters/infocapsules/bc.page

 

Why apply now?

You’ll receive the education grants sooner and your savings will have more time to grow.   Learn more about why an RESP is a smart way to invest in a child’s future by setting up an appointment with a Knowledge First Financial sales representative today.

 

About Knowledge First Financial Inc.

Knowledge First Financial Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Knowledge First Foundation and is the investment fund manager, administrator and distributor of the education savings plans offered by Knowledge First Foundation. For more information about education savings plans from Knowledge First Financial Inc., please visit knowledgefirstfinancial.ca or refer to our prospectus.

As of April 30, 2016, Knowledge First Financial manages $3.62 billion in assets on behalf of more than 250,000 customers.

Knowledge First Financial® is a registered trademark of Knowledge First Financial Inc.

This post was written by Daryl Shriver, and he can be found through his Twitter account.