How do I correct or dispute inaccuracies on my credit file?


I get lots of questions related to Credit Bureaus and items which show up well after they have been paid or which do not belong on there at all.

Having worked for Equifax many, many years ago right after I started working for the CRA and they release all the temporary staff for an 11-month period due to budget cuts, I can proudly say that Equifax makes it very easy to communicate with them regarding any such issues.

It’s all laid out on their website, but I provided a summary here:

Complete and submit a Consumer Credit Report Update Form to Equifax.

It is necessary to specify what information is incorrect or what information does not belong to you.

Equifax will verify that information afterwards as part of their investigation.

You will need to include photocopies of all necessary documents and identification to update your personal Credit Report (Ex: receipts, legal documents, 2 photocopies of pieces of valid identification, including proof of current address)

Fax the request to them at:

Fax: (514) 355-8502

Your request will be processed within 10 to 15 business days. After this period has elapsed, a confirmation letter will be sent to your mailing address.

OR

By Mail:

Equifax Canada Co.
Consumer Relations Department
P.O. Box 190, Station Jean-Talon,
Montreal, Quebec H1S 2Z2

Your request will be processed within 15 to 20 business days . After this period has elapsed, a confirmation letter will be sent to your mailing address.

Equifax will verify the necessary information and mail you a confirmation.

 

Could it be any easier than that?!?

 

Money Mentors’ Advice for 2014 Taxes

I came across this article relating to Canadian Tax Filing for 2014, and thought it was worth a share.  The article can be read via the link below.

Money Mentors’ Advice for 2014 Taxes.

This article outlines how the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) website, http://www.cra.gc.ca, can be used to keep up to date on any changes for 2014, and for 2015, which could help Canadians save money.

Money Mentors list themselves as being “the only Alberta-based, not-for-profit credit counselling agency.”   What I like about this article is that this firm also believes that credit counselling, money coaching, retirement planning, tax saving and community financial literacy are essential to contributing to a healthier financial future for all Canadians.  

Read the article, but as an outline, the topics covered include;

1) RRSP’s and TFSA’s

2) Charitable Donations

3) Medical Expenses 

4) Public Transit

5) Child’s Art/Fitness Amount

6) Childcare Expenses

7) Job-Hunting Expenses

8) First Homes

9) Students 

Enjoy, and please do not forget to get your Canadian Tax Return filed and paid – if at all possible – by April 30th!

If you have any tax-related questions, specifically relating to collection matters with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), you can reach out for a free consult with us via email at intaxicatingtaxservices@gmail.com, or to me, Warren Orlans, at worlans@intaxicating.ca.  We can also be reached on the phone or by text at 416.833.1581.

Please be patient as we are swamped and it may take some time for you to get a response.  Feel free to follow up and bug us in the same manner as the CRA bugs you.  We’re okay with that.

Also feel free to get more information about us at http://www.intaxicating.ca.

TTC fares to increase! Don’t forget the CRA’s Public Transit Deduction.

The Toronto streetcar system is an extensive t...
Public Transit (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Whether you like it or hate it, it is almost a certainty that TTC fares will be increasing in the City of Toronto at some point later this year or early in 2014.  The City of Toronto requires additional funding in order to FINALLY start building subways in the city and the TTC needs extra funds to improve it’s crumbling infrastructure.

Either way, if you are a user of public transit, you need to be aware that you may be eligible for the Canada Revenue Agency’s Public transit deduction.

Eligibility:

These passes must permit unlimited travel within Canada on:

  • local buses;
  • streetcars;
  • subways;
  • commuter trains or buses; and
  • local ferries.

You can also claim the cost of:

Shorter duration passes if:

  • each pass entitles you to unlimited travel for an uninterrupted period of at least 5 days; and
  • you purchase enough of these passes so that you are entitled to unlimited travel for at least 20 days in any 28-day period

Electronic payment cards if:

  • the card is used to make at least 32 one-way trips during an uninterrupted period not exceeding 31 days; and
  • the card is issued by a public transit authority that records and provides a receipt for the cost and usage of the card.

Who can claim these deductions?

Only you or your spouse or common-law partner can claim the cost of transit passes (to the extent that these amounts have not already been claimed) for:

  • yourself;
  • your spouse or common-law partner; and
  • your or your spouse’s or common-law partner’s children who were under 19 years of age on December 31, 2012.

But I do my own tax return.  Where does this go?

It goes on line 364 of Schedule 1, Federal Tax, enter your total public transit amount.

Amount shown on a T4 slip – Enter the amount from box 84 on line 364 of Schedule 1.

Note: If your employer paid your public transit pass, it is a taxable benefit included in your employment income.

Reimbursement of an eligible expense – You can only claim the part of the amount for which you have not been or will not be reimbursed. However, you can claim the full amount if the reimbursement is included in your income, such as a benefit shown on a T4 slip, and you did not deduct the reimbursement anywhere else on your return.

Always remember that if you are going to claim this amount you must keep your Supporting Documentation – receipts and transit passes – In case the CRA asks to see them at a later date.

The CRA will need the following in order to support your claim;

Your transit pass must display all of the following information to support your claim:

  • an indication that it is a monthly (or longer duration) pass;
  • the date or period for which the pass is valid;
  • the name of the transit authority or organization issuing the pass;
  • the amount paid for the pass; and
  • the identity of the rider, either by name or unique identifier.

If the pass does not have all of this information, you will also need to keep receipts, cancelled cheques or credit card statements, along with your pass(es), to support your claim.

The CRA will accept receipts (letters) generated by employers or Employer Pass Program Coordinators for employer transit pass programs.  The receipt should note the purpose, exact amount received, date of payment, and name of the payee.

Generally, the CRA will NOT consider a bank statement to substitute for a valid receipt, however, if your bank statement clearly indicates the purpose of the debit (for example, Employee FareCard), they will accept it as support for your claim.

If your current accountant does not ask you whether you take public transit, then you need to think about what else they are ignoring, and what other deductions you may be missing.

#Intaxicating

Passionate about Tax.  Passionate about helping people.

#IntaxicatingTaxServices

A link to the CRA website to verify this information is below.

Line 364 – Public transit amount

Does the IRS owe YOU money?

This news release from the IRS made me laugh.

Entitled, “Does the IRS owe YOU money”, it made me think back to when the IRS did owe us money and that it took us almost a year to get it back from them.

Nonetheless, I wanted to re-post it and share any additional information I learned while dealing with the IRS.

Here is the IRS press release…

Unclaimed Refunds

Some people may have had taxes withheld from their wages but were not required to file a tax return because they had too little income. Others may not have had any tax withheld but would be eligible for the refundable Earned Income Tax Credit.
•To collect this money a return must be filed with the IRS no later than three years from the due date of the return.
•If no return is filed to claim the refund within three years, the money becomes the property of the U.S. Treasury.
•There is NO penalty assessed by the IRS for filing a late return claiming a credit (refund).
•Current and prior year tax forms and instructions are available on the Forms and Publications web page of IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).
•Information about the Earned Income Tax Credit and how to claim it is also available on IRS.gov.

Undeliverable Refunds

Were you expecting a refund check but didn’t get it?
•Refund checks are mailed to your last known address. Checks are returned to the IRS if you move without notifying the IRS or the U.S. Postal Service.
•You may be able to update your address with the IRS on the “Where’s My Refund?” feature available on IRS.gov. You will be prompted to provide an updated address if there is an undeliverable check outstanding within the last 12 months.
•You can also ensure the IRS has your correct address by filing Form 8822, Change of Address, which is available on IRS.gov or can be ordered by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).
•If you do not have access to the Internet (then I’m not sure how you are reading this…) and think you may be missing a refund, you should first check your records or contact your tax preparer. If your refund information appears correct, call the IRS toll-free assistance line at 800-829-1040 to check the status of your refund and confirm your address.

This line works in Canada but if no one answers after 6 rings, they hang up on you. I swear… I just tried it!