Reminder: T4’s and T4 Summaries are due February 28th to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

I’m worried.

Not for me, but worried for you. I’m worried that you have forgotten to prepare the T4 for your employee, or nanny, and that you will not be able to submit the T4 with the T4 summary to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) by the February 28th deadline.

If you have not completed the T4 or T4 summary yet and are weighing your options, I have some information you need to consider.

First, provided you have been making regular remittances to the CRA, you already have the information you need to submit to the CRA.

Secondly, if you have been making regular remittances the CRA will have sent you a code which allows you to complete the T4 and T4 summary online and which allows you to file online.

Third, if you let the deadline slide by, you are going to pay a penalty.

Say what you will about the Canada Revenue Agency, but they ask and they listen. If you have had the opportunity to attend a CRA information session (or be on a panel as I have) you know that the CRA wants to know what bothers people and how they can improve things. They really do.

In the good old days, when I worked at the CRA, late filing of a T4 was a minimum $100 penalty (plus interest) and late filing of a T4 summary was a minimum $400 penalty to a maximum of $2500.

The CRA has instituted a new administrative policy that applies to certain information returns to ensure that late-filing penalties are charged in a manner that is both fair and reasonable for small businesses. The penalty is the greater of $100 or a penalty determined as follows:

Relieving administrative policy – penalties
Number of information
returns (slips)
Penalty (per day) Maximum penalty
(100 days)
1 – 5 Not applicable $100 flat penalty
6 – 10 $5 $500
11 – 50 $10 $1,000
51 – 500 $15 $1,500
501 – 2,500 $25 $2,500
2,501 – 10,000 $50 $5,000
10,001 or more $75 $7,500

Of course, if you have to get it done by the 28th and you are close on figures, you can always send them your best estimation and amend the return at a later date.  You won’t get hit with the late filing penalties unless your figures are WAY off from the real figures and the CRA feels you sent these numbers to in some way circumvent the rules.  Interest will continue to apply.

Hope you filed on time.

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inTAXicating: Nominated for the 2013 Canadian Blog Awards

I just learned that inTAXicating has been nominated for the 2013 Canadian Blog Awards – under the law category.Canadian Blog Awards badge

If you would to see the other blogs nominated in the other categories or if you would like to vote for inTAXicating, you can follow the link here; http://cdnba.wordpress.com/

Voting ends February 22nd, 2014.

The Canadian Blog Awards are a great way to recognize Canadian blogging talent. By taking the time to read other Canadian blogs and through your voting you are supporting Canadian writers.

I checked out many of the other nominated blogs and voted in each and every category as a way to give back.

Thank you in advance and please keep reading, commenting and asking questions!  Also don’t forget to visit my webpage at http://www.intaxicating.ca for help with all your tax concerns.

A Lesson in POWER: How to ALWAYS Level the Playing Field with the CRA.

Power is a funny thing.

Pretty much everyone wants it at some point in their life.

Most of the people who have it do not know how to use it properly.

To be honest, few will ever get it.

The most important thing to know about power is that it is most successful when used in two ways; either by declaring yourself King and having your cronies keep everyone else at bay by whatever means possible, or secondly by taking the time to get key players on your side and using your network to help you maintain power but all along helping those around you learn and grow, and they help everyone else under them do the same.

Which model do you think is most often associated with government tax collections agencies?

Having spent a lot of time working at the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) in the collections and enforcement division and being responsible for training collections, enforcement and audit staff there I can honestly say not as many staff there who feel you have to do what they say no matter the consequences as you would think.

It is true that there are employees of the CRA who feel that being in a position of power allows them to do things, say things and act in a manner which is improper or unjustified.  There are also staff there who take their positions of power to a whole new level and they let their egos control their decision-making process which means they wield power in order to realize an outcome in their best interest, not yours.

I have seen how power corrupts and the result is never easy to correct.

The CRA has a lot of power.

Throughout my decade of employment at the Canada Revenue Agency I was surprised with how much power the Agency has and how many taxpayers feared this power.  I could hear collection officers tell taxpayers that they could clean out their bank accounts like “this!” (Insert snapping of fingers sound here), which is true, but also not true.  I learned to be subtle in my use of my apparent super-powers and the way I used my power was to visit my clients and by always making sure that when sitting with a taxpayer / representative that my chair was at its highest so that I would be looking down at them.  It was all I needed when dealing with the career tax evaders because it worked, but it was a tactic not necessary when dealing with 99% of the people I met with.

However, we already know that the CRA has a lot of power and in most cases before they use it, they are going to let you know first by phone, letter or a visit to your home or place of employment.  Once the CRA has decided they need to use their powers they are bound by the guidelines set out in the Income Tax Act and Excise Tax Act and by policies and procedures set out in their tax office.  The extent to which they use their powers is either their decision or it is influenced by their team leader or manager.

Once the CRA starts using their powers, your ability to control the outcome diminishes greatly. What you can control, is how much power you will ALLOW the CRA to use against you.

This is done by being proactive – reading notices, asking questions and keeping all your paperwork in one spot where you can access it once it is asked for.  But if you are past that point, or if it is just not possible, then you can take power back by enlisting the help of people who know the CRA policies, procedures and most importantly, their techniques and tactics.

If the CRA knew they were dealing with someone who knew more about their job, more about their techniques and more about how quickly they need to take an action which they claim is urgent, then the playing field is changed forever.

Having someone there to look after your best interests, who will tell you what the best plan of action for you, and you only, then taking that plan to the CRA and telling them the same is the best way to always level the playing field.  Negotiating is always easier when you know more than your opponent.

So please, if you have a tax problem, old or new, and you have been spinning your wheels with the CRA, the IRS, the MRQ, WSIB or the CRTC, don’t let it continue any longer.  Come visit inTAXicating.ca, or send us an email at info@intaxicating.ca and take advantage of our free consultation to leave how to put these issues behind you once and for all.

Have you ever been put in a position where you accepted something which was not in your best interests because the other side had all the power?

Happy to read your comments below.

Happy 2014! Here are 14 things you can do right now to reduce your tax burden, or increase tax credits, on your 2013 taxes.

Happy New Year!  May 2014 bring you wealth, happiness, prosperity and great health.  May it also bring you debt-free (should you need to be) and also allow you to be one step ahead of the taxing authorities.

With the changing of the calendar, many are already working on their new years’ resolutions, but you should also review the list below to see if there are any actions you can do now to reduce your 2013 taxes owing or to increase the amount of refund you will get this year, or in future years.  It’s never the wrong time to thing about tax savings – we do it all the time here at Intaxicating, and want to pass along some tips for you.

Here are 14 easy strategies you can still take advantage of which impact your 2013 taxation year;

 

1.  Make your installment payments as required, or if you have fallen behind, catch up with one lump sum payment right away.

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) charges interest on missed installment payments, but if you catch up in one fell swoop, then they begin to reduce the amount of interest they charge you.  Ssshhh.  It’s a secret.

 

2.  Make sure you file on time and pay in full while doing so.

So how does this impact the 2013 taxation year, you might be asking and why is it so high up the list?  It is because many Canadians are shocked with the amount of money they owe at year-end and it’s the worst time of the year to discuss ways to reduce taxes with your accountant or tax preparer because they are so unbelievably overwhelmed they cannot spare 2 minutes to talk to you, let alone review your return for possible deductions you failed to mention to them. You are not the accountant!  Nor the tax professional.  So take time now to speak to someone who knows about what you do for a living and see if there are areas where you may be entitled to a deduction or credit and then go get that supporting documentation.  Also use the time to run your year-end situation through a free tax program to see how much you owe and what it will take to reduce that, or make it go away completely.

If, however, you are stuck owing a balance to the CRA or MRQ, make sure to set aside the funds to pay it in full with the filing of your tax return.  Heck, you could even send in the money now if you have it, but do not wait until even a day later than the deadline or interest starts accumulating.  The CRA charges 10% interest compounding daily, so it can add up rather quickly.

 

3.  Contribute to your Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP).  

The deadline to contribute to your RRSP for 2013 is March 3rd, 2014.  If you need to know how much you are eligible to contribute to your RRSP. check your 2012 CRA Notice of Assessment.  Or, check online using the CRA’s “My Account” service.  Your contribution limit for 2013 is going to be 18% of your 2012 earned income (to a maximum of $23,820) less your 2012 pension adjustment, if any, plus any RRSP room carried forward from prior years.

 

4.  Contribute to a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP).  

The Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) program was initiated by the federal government to assist families saving for their children’s post-secondary education.  As an added bonus, the government tops up your annual contribution by 20%, up to a maximum of $500 ($2,500 contributions x 20%) per beneficiary per calendar year, to a lifetime maximum of $7,200. 

 

5. If you turned 71-years-old, you must collapse your RRSP.

If you turned 71-years-old by December 31, 2013, you must collapse your RRSP by the end of the year. At that time, you have 3 choices to make; either pay tax on the fair market value of the plan’s assets, transfer your RRSP into a Registered Retirement Fund Income Fund (RRIF), or purchase an annuity with the proceeds.  No tax is paid at the time of the purchase of the annuity or at the time of conversion into a RRIF.  You may still be able to contribute to your spouse’s RRSP under certain conditions.

 

6.  Make your Home Buyers’ Plan repayment before it is included in your income for the year.

The Home Buyers’ Plan (HBP) is a program that allows you to withdraw funds from your registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) to buy or build a qualifying home for yourself or for a related person with a disability. You can withdraw up to $25,000 in a calendar year.   

Generally, you have to repay all withdrawals to your RRSPs within a period of no more than 15 years. You will have to repay an amount to your RRSPs each year until your HBP balance is zero. If you do not repay the amount to your RRSP, for 2012, it will have to be included in your income for that year.  The deadline is

March 3rd, 2014.

 

7.  Pay the interest on low-interest loans related to income-splitting.

If you have entered into an income-splitting arrangement with family members and have loaned funds to either a spouse or a child at the interest rate set (quarterly) by the CRA, make sure that the interest on these loans are paid before January 30, 2014, or the loans will be subject to the attribution rules which taxes the income earned by your spouse or child in your hands.

 

8.  Pay the interest on an employer-loan to avoid it becoming a taxable benefit.

If in 2012, you received a low-interest loan from your employer you will want to ensure that interest is paid on that loan before January 30, 2014 in order to avoid a deemed taxable employment benefit. This benefit will be calculated at the CRA’s prescribed rate for the period that the loan was outstanding (which increased from 1% to 2%, effective October 1, 2013) less any interest actually paid.  This is not to be confused with a loan taken out as a result of shares owned.

 

9.  Reduce your business income by paying your family members who work for you.

As a business owner, it is beneficial to pay your family members a wage consistent with a wage you would pay to a complete stranger in order to reducing the amount of income in your business.  Also ensure that you are remitting to the CRA the CPP, EI and tax amounts on these payments.  You will need to issue them a T4, and file a T4 summary with the CRA by February 28th, 2014.

 

10.  File any T4’s and the T4 summary before the CRA deadline of February 28th, 2014 in order to avoid any penalties and interest.

If you are short on remitting for any employees, take advantage of the January 15th remittance – the last one for 2013 – and also consider the Payment on Filing (POF) option to top up amounts with the filing of the T4 summary.  Keep in mind, if you use the POF option to catch up on a considerable amount of funds, the CRA will still charge you maximum penalties.  

 

11.  Pay back any personal operating costs on employer-provided cars.  

If your employer provides you with a company car, you already know that it is a taxable benefit and it will be included on your T4.  Did you know that the actual benefit is made up of two parts; The first part is a standby charge based on a percentage of the original cost or the monthly lease payments for the car, and the second part applies if your employer pays the automobile’s operating expenses.  In 2013, this benefit is equal to 27¢ per personal kilometre driven.  The standby charge and the operating benefit are reduced by the amounts you pay to your employer.  For a standby charge reduction, your payment must have been made during 2013.  For an operating benefit reduction, your payment must be made by February 14, 2014.

 

12.  Has the tax burden from previous years got you considering bankruptcy?  

You are not alone!  In Canada 55% of bankruptcies are CRA related.  Before you speak with a trustee, speak with your trusted tax professionals at Intaxicating Tax Services, who can tell you whether or not the debt is fully collectible, and if there are other options available to you which will not ruin your credit for 7 years.  Even if the CRA is breathing down your neck, they are not allowed to tell you to file for bankruptcy and they like to think they understand when someone is insolvent, but we have the expertise, and the network to help you out of debt or, if you decide to proceed with a bankruptcy, or proposal, get you the best deal possible. 

 

13.  Google your tax problem!

You might have heard that it can be dangerous to Google  that you have a tax problem, however nothing can be further from the truth.  The CRA has all their tax information online and there are a plethora of tax-related resources available to help you determine if you should go it alone or if additional help is needed.  Make sure when you are doing your research that the information you are reading matches with the CRA website, does not sound too good to be true or is written in such a way to scare you into thinking you need to pay for a service you may not.  Most reputable firms will offer a free consultation, or a nominal fee for an hour meeting followed up with a written report to help you decide what to do.  Don’t rush into something until you have all the facts.

 

14.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help!

Speak with your accountant / tax professional about any deductions that you may be entitled to such as the public transit tax credit or for working at home.  If your accountant has not already asked you about what you do in detail then it’s up to you to determine if you need to brush up on the tax act yourself, or find a new tax team to help you pay the least amount of tax possible, like the tax professionals at Intaxicating Tax Services.  If, on the other hand, you are having issues with collections, then we are the only place to go based on our hands-on experience on both sides of the negotiating table.

 

Happy 2014.

 

We are:

InTAXicating Tax Services

@intaxicating

info@intaxicating.ca

416.833.1581.

http://www.facebook.com/intaxicating

When a Lien is Registered Against Your Property: What does that really mean to you?

English: Northwest corner of the Connaught Bui...
CRA HQ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I came across an interesting article this morning regarding liens, governments (municipal – property taxes, Federal – the Canada Revenue Agency), and the idea that people with unpaid taxes, or tax debts run the risk of losing their properties to the government.  The article can be read here, and the title of the article –

“More Hamiltonians losing properties due to unpaid taxes”

– scared the death out of me because I know the truth about liens, and right away I suspected something was out of sorts.

I continued to read the article which explained that due to a decline in manufacturing jobs, coupled with a prolonged economic downturn (recession) people are struggling to pay their bills, so the one bill they seem to be delaying payment on most often is their property taxes.  In fact, the article states that, “A record number of properties are being slapped with liens because Hamilton home and business owners can’t pay their taxes.  By the end of 2013, the city will have registered more than 500 properties after warning owners that time is up to pay their overdue taxes.”

That is a lot of back taxes, and you know that there will come a time when the city’s Director of Taxation will have to find some “incentive” to “encourage” people to pay their taxes and that could come in the form of making an example of someone very publicly in order to show the rest of the delinquent accounts what is going to happen to them… Soon… Maybe…

But is this article not the public shaming itself?

If you were unaware of the consequences of having outstanding property taxes, you would think that the government is going to slap on a lien, then come and take your house from you.  I thought maybe the residents of Hamilton were losing their properties to the government, that the government is seizing and selling them in order to recover the unpaid property taxes at a rate far greater than anywhere else in Canada, and that certainly is not the case if you read the entire article.

While the facts clearly point to an increase in properties registered with tax liens from 2008 when the recession began until 2012, one needs to wonder if it has to do with an increase in prpoerty taxes owing, or if maybe another factor falls into play – maybe employees are getting better with practice registering liens to secure the government’s interest.

Below are the number of registered liens in Hamilton per year:

2008: 323

2009: 354

2010: 368

2011: 377

2012: 400

2013 (projected): 500+

Interesting, however, the reality is that, “Few properties are actually sold in city tax sales. There were six in 2012 and three the year before.”

So what does this exercise actually mean to the government and to you, the taxpayer?

It points out that the government will register a lien on any property you own in order to secure their interest in a tax debt you have.  Municipalities do it, and the CRA does it.  To be honest, the CRA should be registering liens against any and all properties which have equity in them.

The lien sits on the property and the owner is not allowed to sell or re-finance the property until the lien is paid in full.  In fact, most financial institutions will only lend money in instances where there is a lien provided that the agreement entails payment in full of the lien and word from government that the lien is going to be removed upon receipt of the full payment.

So how does this explain the seizing and selling of 2 properties?

Simply.

The CRA, for example, makes it a policy to never seize a property where doing so would result in them having to “live in the street”.  They will, however, never blink twice if the property they have registered a lien against is an income property, a cottage or in the case of a car, a second car.   Those are fair game.

Does that mean you can ignore the lien?

Heck no!

But you need to know if the government is actively searching for assets to seize and sell, or if they are securing their interests.  While they may not tell you, they will probably let your representative know – which is why prolonged tax issues regularly need a different voice to help the CRA understand that there is a person at the other end of the telephone and that nobody wants to be in a debt position they cannot get out of.

So before you ignore the debt, or the lien, you should understand that there is the possibility that the CRA could seize your asset in very short notice.

Don’t take a lien lightly.

Lien on Me: The CRA and Liens. Questions Answered.

When the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) registers a lien against your home, they are securing their interest by attaching the repayment of their debt to your property.

CDAHQsignage2

The CRA considers a lien to be enforcement action and this tool is commonly applied where there are properties in the name of a taxpayer who has a tax debt.  Collection officers at the CRA should be registering liens, or securing the Crown’s interest, much more frequently then they currently are, and it should be done whenever there is a tax debt of a considerable amount owing.

Below are some answers to common questions about CRA property liens to help you understand what to do, and where to turn for help.

1.  How to tell if there is a lien registered against your property 

A title search on your property will reveal the existence of a lien.

It is CRA policy that they advise you by letter when a Certificate has been registered in Federal Court which identifies the property in question and the balance owing for which they are preparing to register a lien.  This does not mean that a lien has been registered, but this is essentially a warning of impending action.

If, however, the CRA does not have your correct address you will not receive any notices and thus may only discover there’s a lien when you try to sell or refinance your property.  A title search reveals the existence of liens.

2.  When the CRA registers a Certificate do they always then register a lien?

Not necessarily.  The CRA could be using the Certificate in several ways, including; to secure their interest in the property to make sure that before the tax debtors interest in the property is liquidated, the tax debt is paid in full, or in order to get the attention of the property owner so they will begin negotiations with the CRA, or they may have the intention of proceeding with the seizure and sale of the property in order to pay off all or part of a tax liability.

3.  Will the CRA take my house and leave me homeless?

It is CRA policy to not seize and sell a property when it would result in the property owner having nowhere to live.  If this property is an income property or cottage or secondary place to live, then the CRA will likely proceed to realize on the property and pay off their debts.

4.  Have I lost title to my home?

No. A lien is a registration on the title of that property which prevents you from selling or refinancing that property until either the tax debt owing is paid in full, or there is a written arrangement to have the proceeds from a sale or refinancing directed to the CRA for full payment of the debt.

5.  What is a Writ of Fi Fa / Writ of Seizure and Sale?

If a Certificate has been registered in the Federal Court and the tax balance still exists, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) will register a Writ of Fi Fa (abbreviation of “fieri facias” which is Latin and means “that you cause to be made”).  It is a writ of execution obtained in legal action which is addressed to the sheriff and commands him to, in this case, seize and sell, the property of the person against whom the judgement has been obtained.

This is a very serious enforcement action and after your property is sold, you are entitled to any proceeds left over after the tax arrears have been paid in full.

6.  What are my options now that a Certificate has been registered and a lien applied to the property?

Even though the CRA has an interest in the property, you can still access the equity and use that equity to make arrangements with the CRA – or the Department of Justice – to refinance the property or even sell it with the understanding that this can only be done in conjunction with the CRA receiving full payment of their tax debt.

7.  What is the CRA’s priority regarding my property should I decide to sell it?

Assuming your mortgage is a traditional mortgage through a recognized financial institution, the proceeds from a sale should fall in this order (depending on the type of tax(es) owing);

1. Financial institution holding the mortgage

2. Secured lenders

3. Canada Revenue Agency

4. Other creditors who have registrations against the property

5. Property owner.

So if you have other debts including a tax liability (and the two tend to go hand-in-hand), then it is possible in this scenario to have nothing left over by the time the property is sold and all debtors are paid off.

8.  What if I owe CRA more than there they get from the sale of my property?

If, after the sale of your property there are still taxes owing to the CRA, them your tax balance is reduced by the amount the CRA is paid and the remainder is still owing to the CRA.

9.  What if I am not the only one on title – ie/ jointly with a spouse?  

In the case where there are more than one person on title in addition to you, it’s important to keep in mind that the CRA can only realize proceeds from your share of the equity in the property.  So if you sell, re-finance or are forced to sell, only your share of the equity can be paid out the CRA. The CRA cannot seize your spouses’, or anyone else’s equity.

Keep in mind that in order to get the Certificate, the CRA has to reconcile the account, determine the share owned by the tax debtor and then use that figure when sending the Sheriff out to seize and sell the property.

10.  The CRA has registered a lien against my property.  Can I sell my interest to someone else and get removed off title?

If a tax debtor initiates a transaction which puts an asset out of reach of the Canada Revenue Agency not at Fair Market Value, the CRA has the ability to initiate a section 160 Non-Arms Length assessment and assess the person(s) who received the asset for your liability (minus consideration received).  

11.  Will bankruptcy free me of a lien?

Filing for bankruptcy, or filing a consumer proposal, does not discharge a lien against your property. If you go bankrupt on your CRA debt, the lien remains and – even worse – accrues interest over time. Even after your discharge from bankruptcy, the lien remains in force, until you eventually sell your home and the CRA’s priority is now second in line after the bank.

If after all that the tax debt is still remaining, then and only then because of the bankruptcy, will the tax debt no longer be owing.

Who Can Help?

The bottom line here is that tax liens can cause serious problems and it’s best to seek our help to resolve your tax issues before it gets that far.  Even if a lien is in place in order to secure the Crown’s interest, it’s best not to ignore the CRA.

We have handled hundreds of liens, and will find the best solution for you.  I might be re-financing your mortgage, paying out the lien, or temporarily lifting the lien in order to improve your arrangement with the CRA.  Whatever the problem, no matter how complex, we’ve helped.

Initial consultations are always free.

Visit us at http://www.//intaxicating.ca, or drop us an email at info@intaxicating.ca.  You can also reach us by phone at 416.833.1581.

Toronto-based.  Canada-wide.