What’s New For 2018: CRA

The Filing deadline for your 2017 Personal Tax Return (T1) is April 30th, 2018.

While most Canadian income tax and benefit returns for 2017 are due on April 30, 2018, if you or your spouse or common-law partner is self-employed, you have until June 15, 2018.

You can file online as early as February 26, 2018.

Filing early ensures your benefit and credit payments are not delayed or stopped.

If you have a spouse or common-law partner, they should also file a return early.

The benefit and credit payments include (Link to CRA website included):

This year, the Canada Revenue Agency is making it easier for paper tax filers to do their taxes by mailing them their forms and guides directly.

Want your tax refund faster?

You can register for  the CRA’s direct deposit, and receive your income tax refunds and benefits quickly and securely, however, if you provide the CRA with your bank information AND fall into tax troubles, the CRA can, and will, use that bank account to freeze or seize the money in it to pay off the debt.

Additionally, there are some new changes which can impact your tax return, some of which include;

Medical Expense Tax Credit for Reproductive Expenses

The medical expense tax credit provides relief for individuals who have paid significant medical expenses for themselves or certain dependants.  This credit is non-refundable credit and is intended to reduce taxes owing.

Effective for 2017, amounts paid for reproductive technologies for the purpose of conceiving a child can be claimed as a medical expense tax credit, even if the individual does not have a medical condition preventing them from conceiving a child. Previously, the medical expense tax credit was available if the use of the reproductive technologies directly related to a medical infertility condition.

A request can be made to the Canada Revenue Agency to claim reproductive technologies expenses unclaimed in the last 10 calendar years.

Certification of Disability Tax Credit Certificate

The Disability Tax Credit program provides relief for individuals who have a severe and prolonged impairment in physical and mental functions by providing a non-refundable tax credit that can reduce taxes owing.

As of March 2017, nurse practitioners and medical doctors are allowed to certify Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate.

Federal Public Transit Credit

After June 30, 2017, amounts paid for eligible transit passes no longer qualify for a non-refundable tax credit, however, you can claim a non-refundable tax credit in your 2017 income tax and benefit return for eligible transit passes paid from January 1, 2017 to June 30, 2017.

As a result of the changes made to the Federal Public Transit Credit, the Ontario government introduced a new refundable tax credit effective July 1, 2017, and to be eligible to claim this credit, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Be 65 years of age at the beginning of the year;
  • Reside in Ontario at the end of the year; and
  • Paid for eligible transit service from July 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017 (receipts should be retained).

The maximum refundable credit that can be claimed for 2017 is $225. For subsequent years, the maximum refundable credit is $450. Visit the Canada.ca site here, for additional information.

Tuition, Education and Textbook Credit

Effective January 1, 2017, the Federal, education and textbook credits were eliminated, however, any unused credits from previous years can be carried-forward.

As a result of the 2016 Ontario Budget, changes were made to the Ontario tuition and education non-refundable tax credits. Credit is available for eligible tuition fees paid for studies before September 5, 2017. In addition, credit for the education amount is available for months of study before September 2017. Unused credits from previous years can be carried forward.

FILE

Of most importance is that you must file that tax return on time to the CRA.  If you have a habit of being late, the CRA will increase the amount of the Late Filing Penalty (LFP) year-over-year, and they multiply that percentage against the amount of taxes owing.  There is not limit to the amount of penalties which can be charged, and the most I have seen is 93%.  That is a LOT, and it’s in addition to the taxes owing!

If you need assistance with anything discussed above, or if you require more details, or have CRA debts, you can reach us at info@intaxicating.ca for your coast-to-coast CRA Collections expertise.

Visit our website, http://www.intaxicating.ca.

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Deductions, Deductions, Where Fore Art Thou Deductions?

For those of you who prefer to wait until the last-minute to do your taxes – remember the deadline is May 5th, 2014 this year only – you might be just now looking for items to deduct in order to reduce an amount owing, or just because you have to get that information and now you are wondering if they are deductible.

Or, maybe your tax return has been completed for you and now you are holding the draft of that return and before you sign it – which tells the CRA that you agree with the information in it, so you cannot say I didn’t know what was being filed! – and you want to make sure your accountant / tax preparer did their job and notified you of all the eligible deductions you are entitled to, then this post will be quite useful to you!

The big question: What you can deduct?

When preparing your tax return there are many deductions and tax credits you may be eligible to claim in order to reduce the amount of tax you must pay, if they apply to you.

Any eligible deductions are reported on lines 205 to 485 of your personal tax return.  More specifically, deductions from income and tax credits are reported on lines 205 to 485 and these lines are deducted from line 150 to give you your net income amount (line 236).

Here is a line index from the Canada Revenue Agency website listing the deduction and for more information you will need to follow the link and read the details.

Lines 244 – 260 are deducted from line 236 to give you your taxable income amount (line 260).

Lines 300 – 378 are non-refundable tax credits and reduce your federal tax. However, if the total of these credits is more than your federal tax, you will not get a refund for the difference. Remember to claim the corresponding provincial or territorial non-refundable tax credits to which you are entitled on your provincial or territorial Form 428.

Lines 405 – 485 are your federal and provincial or territorial taxes payable, your federal and provincial or territorial tax credits and your refund or balance owing amounts. The federal and provincial or territorial tax credits reduce your tax payable. If the total of these credits is more than your total tax, you could get a refund for the difference. Claim all available provincial or territorial tax credits on your provincial or territorial form which may be applicable to you.

Complete the provincial or territorial tax and credit forms for the province or territory where you resided on December 31, 2013.

Hope this help!

 

Happy deducting!

 

#inTAXicating

#tax

Thursday Thirteen: 13 Tax-Related Things That Confuse Canadians.

I came across this interesting article from the Globe and Mail newspaper called “10 Tax Related Things that Leave Canadians Stumped”, and while I suggest you read the original article, I have used this article for inspiration to provide 13 Tax-Related Things that Confuse Canadians.

  1. Why can’t spouses file joint income tax returns as they can do in the US?
  2. Why are parents only allowed a transfer of $5,000 of their child’s unused tuition, education and book credits?  The parent is often the one who paid the costs of tuition, should they not be able use all of it?
  3. If I received an actual dividend of $1,000, why do I report $1,380 on my tax return ($380 is called a “dividend gross-up” and the purpose of grossing up a payment is to bring the dividend back up to the amount of money the corporation earned before it paid corporate tax.
  4. Why must child care expenses be claimed by the lower-income spouse?  Understanding that the motivation behind this child care deduction is to get people with children back to work to help drive the economy, but the way this deduction is written it is claimed by the lower-income spouse based on 2/3rds of their income.  By doing this, the deduction is constrained by that spouse’s income.  Should it not be based on the higher-earning spouse so that the family could often get a larger child care claim to offset the costs and since it’s being paid, why are they not allowed to claim it in full in each and every case?
  5. When one spouse has a tax refund and the other owes money, why can’t you net the refund and tax payment against each other? Again, this would simplify our tax system and reduce the administration and paper work for the CRA, but the privacy rules are cited for this not happening. but should the situation be different – a spouse with a debt – and they are all over that!
  6. Why do people hold on to their investments too long before converting them, resulting in a capital gain becoming a capital loss?  Yes, the tax on capital gains is 23% but paying tax on a gain is much better than losing money, isn’t it?
  7. How is it that the CRA never knows when people move when they are looking for missing filings or returns but they always know where I am when they need to send a legal warning letter or register a lien against a property.?
  8. Why do people pay no attention to the RRSP contribution limit information on their income tax assessments when planning their contributions for the year, usually at the last-minute in March? An individual’s RRSP contribution limit for the upcoming year is printed right on the Notice of Assessment for the prior year and can be found through the “My Accounts” section of the CRA website.
  9. Why can self-employed people claim mortgage interest as a home-office expense while employees cannot? If you have an employer that requires you to work from home and they sign a T2200 form saying so, why should an employee’s deductible expenses be restricted in comparison to a self-employed person’s?
  10. Why can I deduct my car expenses when I drive directly to my client’s office from my home – but when I drive to my own office to work with the client via teleconference or telephone, why is the mileage considered personal?
  11. Why is the maximum childcare expense set at $7,000, when the monthly child care cost far exceeds $1,000 in many cities? It drops to $4,000 for children aged 7 to 16.
  12. If the CRA send me a refund cheque in error – their error – and whether I cash it or not, they charge me penalties and interest when they recover it?
  13. How a CRA audit deemed to be a “random” audit where the auditor states that they are not looking for anything, always has something behind it which caused it.  Why can’t they just say, “You’ve been snitched on”, or “You claimed an expense with a fake invoice” or even “You took cash from your business and deposited it into your personal account.”  That way, knowing the gig is up, the auditor could transfer all like issues over and assess and give the person a warning that will have meaning.

Can anyone answer any of these?

 

Time will tell.

Claiming Gas or Mileage? How to avoid having this expense denied by the Canada Revenue Agency.

Many taxpayers here in Canada are advised to “keep their receipts” when they claim mileage and / or gas on their tax returns.  The thought here is that the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) might audit your tax return and will deny your claim if you cannot show proof, but what are you allowed to deduct?  Does it matter if you are self-employed or if you are a salaried employee?  Did you know that just keeping your receipts is not enough and there might be deductions you are entitled to that you are not claiming?

It all matters.

If you are claiming vehicle expenses and you are a salaried T4 employee working for someone else, then you need to know this;

Or, if you are self employed, you need to know this;

So if you rely on your accountant to take care of this for you, or if you wish to use the services of Intaxicating Tax Services, at the very least, you need to be aware of this important fact;

The CRA regularly rejects gas receipts from taxpayers who pay for their gas with debit cards.  Why?  Because they are not sure if you are getting cash back on the transaction – that does not show on the debit slip.

Example: I go to fill up my car 3 times a week, and each time I put in $20.00 worth of gasoline, but get cash back of $80.00 each time.  My debit slip reads $100.00, and I claim $300.00 worth of gasoline expenses for that week on my tax return when in actual fact I was only entitled to receive a deduction in the amount of $60.00.

In addition, if you are required to travel a lot for work, make sure that you have a calendar at home and at the office (on the office computers) which show the location of the meeting, the name of the organization and / or people that you are meeting, as well as the purpose of the meeting (ie/ sales, cold call, delivery).  Make sure that you track the mileage as well.  This way when the CRA questions the high claims, you can show them with 100% certainty that your travel claims are for work purposes.

It also helps to keep all the gas transactions on the same credit card for organizational purposes.

It takes a little effort and organization but it’s worth it.

Intaxicating Tax Services can be found @ http://www.intaxicating.ca and make sure to drop by our helpful blog here.

IRS Releases 2011 Tax Rates

Below is the IRS press release identifying the 2011 Adjusted tax rates, effective January 1, 2011.

SECTION 1. PURPOSE
This revenue procedure sets forth inflation adjusted items for 2011. Other inflation adjusted items for 2011 are in Rev. Proc. 2010-40, 2010-46 I.R.B. 663 (dated November 15, 2010).

SECTION 2. 2011 ADJUSTED ITEMS
Tax Rate Tables.

For taxable years beginning in 2011, the tax rate tables under § 1 are as follows:
TABLE 1 – Section 1(a) – Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns and Surviving Spouses
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $17,000 10% of the taxable income
Over $17,000 but $1,700 plus 15% of
not over $69,000 the excess over $17,000
Over $69,000 but $9,500 plus 25% of
not over $139,350 the excess over $69,000
Over $139,350 but $27,087.50 plus 28% of
not over $212,300 the excess over $139,350
Over $212,300 but $47,513.50 plus 33% of
not over $379,150 the excess over $212,300
Over $379,150 $102,574 plus 35% of
the excess over $379,150

TABLE 2 – Section 1(b) – Heads of Households
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $12,150 10% of the taxable income
Over $12,150 but $1,215 plus 15% of
not over $46,250 the excess over $12,150
Over $46,250 but $6,330 plus 25% of
not over $119,400 the excess over $46,250
Over $119,400 but $24,617.50 plus 28% of
not over $193,350 the excess over $119,400
Over $193,350 but $45,323.50 plus 33% of
not over $379,150 the excess over $193,350
Over $379,150 $106,637.50 plus 35% of
the excess over $379,150

TABLE 3 – Section 1(c) – Unmarried Individuals (other than Surviving Spouses and Heads of Households)

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $8,500 10% of the taxable income
Over $8,500 but $850 plus 15% of
not over $34,500 the excess over $8,500
Over $34,500 but $4,750 plus 25% of
not over $83,600 the excess over $34,500
Over $83,600 but $17,025 plus 28% of
not over $174,400 the excess over $83,600
Over $174,400 but $42,449 plus 33% of
not over $379,150 the excess over $174,400
Over $379,150 $110,016.50 plus 35% of
the excess over $379,150

TABLE 4 – Section 1(d) – Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $8,500 10% of the taxable income
Over $8,500 but $850 plus 15% of
not over $34,500 the excess over $8,500
Over $34,500 but $4,750 plus 25% of
not over $69,675 the excess over $34,500
Over $69,675 but $13,543.75 plus 28% of
not over $106,150 the excess over $69,675
Over $106,150 but $23,756.75 plus 33% of
not over $189,575 the excess over $106,150
Over $189,575 $51,287 plus 35% of
the excess over $189,575

TABLE 5 – Section 1(e) – Estates and Trusts
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $2,300 15% of the taxable income
Over $2,300 but $345 plus 25% of
not over $5,450 the excess over $2,300
Over $5,450 but $1,132.50 plus 28% of
not over $8,300 the excess over $5,450
Over $8,300 but $1,930.50 plus 33% of
not over $11,350 the excess over $8,300
Over $11,350 $2,937 plus 35% of
the excess over $11,350

Child Tax Credit.

For taxable years beginning in 2011, the value used in § 24(d)(1)(B)(i) to determine the amount of credit under § 24 that may be refundable is $3,000.

Hope Scholarship, American Opportunity, and Lifetime Learning Credits.
(1) For taxable years beginning in 2011, the Hope Scholarship Credit under
§ 25A(b)(1), as increased under § 25A(i) (the American Opportunity Tax Credit), is an amount equal to 100 percent of qualified tuition and related expenses not in excess of $2,000 plus 25 percent of those expenses in excess of $2,000, but not in excess of $4,000. Accordingly, the maximum Hope Scholarship Credit allowable under § 25A(b)(1) for taxable years beginning in 2011 is $2,500.
(2) For taxable years beginning in 2011, a taxpayer’s modified adjusted gross income in excess of $80,000 ($160,000 for a joint return) is used to determine the reduction under § 25A(d)(2) in the amount of the Hope Scholarship Credit otherwise allowable under § 25A(a)(1). For taxable years beginning in 2011, a taxpayer’s modified adjusted gross income in excess of $51,000 ($102,000 for a joint return) is used to determine the reduction under § 25A(d)(2) in the amount of the Lifetime Learning Credit otherwise allowable under § 25A(a)(2).

Earned Income Credit.
(1) In general. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the following amounts are used to determine the earned income credit under § 32(b). The “earned income amount” is the amount of earned income at or above which the maximum amount of the earned income credit is allowed. The “threshold phaseout amount” is the amount of adjustedgross income (or, if greater, earned income) above which the maximum amount of the credit begins to phase out. The “completed phaseout amount” is the amount of adjusted gross income (or, if greater, earned income) at or above which no credit is allowed. The threshold phaseout amounts and the completed phaseout amounts shown in the table below for married taxpayers filing a joint return include the increase provided in § 32(b)(3)(B)(i), as adjusted for inflation for taxable years beginning in 2011.

Number of Qualifying Children
Item One Two Three or More None
Earned Income $9,100 $12,780 $12,780 $6,070
Amount
Maximum Amount of Credit $3,094 $5,112 $5,751 $464
Threshold Phaseout $16,690 $16,690 $16,690 $7,590
Amount (Single, Surviving Spouse, or Head of Household) Completed Phaseout $36,052 $40,964 $43,998 $13,660
Amount (Single, Surviving Spouse, or Head of Household) Threshold Phaseout $21,770 $21,770 $21,770 $12,670
Amount (Married Filing Jointly)Completed Phaseout $41,132 $46,044 $49,078 $18,740
Amount (Married Filing Jointly)
The instructions for the Form 1040 series provide tables showing the amount of the earned income credit for each type of taxpayer.
(2) Excessive investment income. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the earned income tax credit is not allowed under § 32(i) if the aggregate amount of certain investment income exceeds $3,150.

Standard Deduction.
(1) In general. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the standard deduction amounts under § 63(c)(2) are as follows:
Filing Status Standard Deduction
Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns $11,600
and Surviving Spouses (§ 1(a))
Heads of Households (§ 1(b)) $8,500
Unmarried Individuals (other than Surviving Spouses $5,800
and Heads of Households) (§ 1(c))
Married Individuals Filing Separate $5,800
Returns (§ 1(d))
(2) Dependent. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the standard deduction amount under § 63(c)(5) for an individual who may be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer cannot exceed the greater of (1) $950, or (2) the sum of $300 and the individual’s earned income.
(3) Aged or blind. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the additional standard deduction amount under § 63(f) for the aged or the blind is $1,150. These amounts are increased to $1,450 if the individual is also unmarried and not a surviving spouse.

Qualified Transportation Fringe. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the monthly limitation under § 132(f)(2)(A), regarding the aggregate fringe benefit exclusion amount for transportation in a commuter highway vehicle and any transit pass, and under
§ 132(f)(2)(B), regarding the fringe benefit exclusion amount for qualified parking, is $230.

Personal Exemption.
(1) Exemption amount. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the personal exemption amount under § 151(d) is $3,700.

Interest on Education Loans. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the $2,500 maximum deduction for interest paid on qualified education loans under § 221 begins to phase out under § 221(b)(2)(B) for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income in excess of $60,000 ($120,000 for joint returns), and is completely phased out for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of $75,000 or more ($150,000 or more for joint returns).

SECTION 3. EFFECTIVE DATE
This revenue procedure applies to taxable years beginning in 2011.