Ontario Contractor Pleads Guilty to Tax Evasion

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has reported that a Vaughan, Ontario based, general contractor has been fined for evading GST/HST.

The press release by the CRA announces that Gilles Larocque of Nobleton, Ontario pleaded guilty to tax evasion. He was sentenced in the Ontario Court of Justice in Newmarket and fined a total of $301,125.

Larocque pleaded guilty on January 7, 2020, in the Ontario Court of Justice in Newmarket, Ontario to two counts of failing to report income by not filing income tax returns, thereby committing tax evasion under the Income Tax Act.

He also pleaded guilty to two counts of failing to remit Goods and Services Tax / Harmonized Sales Tax (GST/HST) under the Excise Tax Act.

A CRA investigation revealed that Larocque, who owned and operated a construction company in the Vaughan, Ontario area, provided general contracting work to clients that included dry walling, framing and ceiling tile installation for gas stations.

Larocque used several aliases and business names and charged clients for GST/HST, which he used for his personal expenses.

Larocque failed to report income in both 2013 and 2014 tax years and evaded a total of $180,401 in federal taxes.

He also failed to file GST/HST returns in both those years, totalling $120,724 in unremitted GST/HST.

The total amount of federal tax evaded and unremitted GST/HST for the years 2013 and 2014 was $301,125.

Charging GST/HST to clients and then keeping it for your own use is not only against the law, but it’s a pretty sketchy way to get another 13% of income. A common rule to avoid this from happening it to always make sure that you ask for a receive a receipt. The receipt pretty-much (but not always) ensures that the seller is reporting the GST/HST that they collect from you, and the income earned from your purchase.

 

 

IRS Indoor Tanning Excise Tax comes into effect July 1st, 2010.

IRS 10% excise tax on indoor tanning industry.

If you live in, or visit America, and love that fake, baked-on tan, it’s going to cost you 10% more to get that well-done feeling, as of July 1st.

The IRS issued regulations outlining the administration of a 10% excise tax on indoor tanning services that goes into effect on July 1st, 2010.
The regulations were published today in the Federal Register.
In general, providers of indoor tanning services will collect the tax at the time the purchaser pays for the tanning services. The provider then pays over these amounts to the government, quarterly, along with IRS Form 720, Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return.
The tax does not apply to phototherapy services performed by a licensed medical professional on his or her premises. The regulations also provide an exception for certain physical fitness facilities that offer tanning as an incidental service to members without a separately identifiable fee.

Hmmmm. Taxing the tanning industry?!? I guess that may push people out into the sunlight more often, which may not be such a bad idea considering all the debate about how dangerous tanning beds are and their suspected link to cancer. Then again, if the IRS could tax natural sunlight, trust me, you would be paying it too.