Not All Tax Information Found on the Internet is true! Are you shocked?!?

Did you know that not all the tax information and suggestions you find on the Internet are true?

Of course you knew that!

I’ve joked with everyone from my children, to family, friends, employers, employees and even director’s and CEO’s of huge organizations that tax information “must be true!  It’s on the Internet”, no matter how absurd it might appear to be.

We all know, or should know to take everything we read with a grain of salt… and that fact-checking is critical when trying to decide if information is legitimate, completely made up, or aimed to scare you.

Sources

As we scroll through pages and pages of information, reading about situations and stories about how the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers tax law here in Canada it is easy to lose sight of goal, which is to get a better understanding of what is acceptable and what is not regarding so many aspects of taxation.  The best indicator of how close to the truth an article is can be determined by the sources cited in that piece.

An article about the CRA with a link to the CRA website (which backs up the facts) is the best indicator that the author knows their stuff.

If, however, you come across an article which has no references, no supporting links to the originating source, or links from a website titled something like “I_want_to_stop_the_CRA.org” then you can be assured the information is not going to be accurate, it is not going to help you, and more likely it was written to scare you, or present a horror story to get you to contact them to help you.

Don’t waste your time on those… Ever!

When a prominent tax lawyer wanted everyone to stop looking for solutions on the Internet it was presented that the CRA could find out you have a tax problem by sneaking into your house, taking your computer, breaking in to it, and seeing that you have been looking for tax help online.

GASP.

Well, guess what?

If the CRA has to come and seize your computer, they already know you have a tax problem!  They cannot seize your computer unless it’s part of a criminal investigation.

The true intention of these ads is not to warn you about a new power that the CRA has secretly acquired, but rather this firm doesn’t want you seeing that there are options available for you online to fix the problem yourself.  So they scare you away from the Internet so you won’t find helpful tips and solutions at firms like this one, inTAXicating.

Better to hire them then get advice from a real former CRA Collection employee to help get you back on track.

In a capitalistic marketplace I don’t blame them, but I am concerned.  Tax is confusing, especially when a tax problem suddenly arises and the CRA is pressuring you to fix it quickly in one of their 3 ways:

1) Pay it

2) File up-to-date and watch the balance go away, or,

3) Go bankrupt.

How can you be expected to make that sudden choice which has significant short and long-term implications on you, your business, your family and your life, without having the facts, all the facts, and not just the facts the CRA wants you to have, or that you believe they are telling you.

That’s where I come in, specifically, this blog, this business and this business model.

I want you to know the truth.

I want you to be able to make an informed decision whether that decision is made via information found on this blog, or on my website, or through an email to me.  I want you to be able to understand the CRA and their collection, enforcement, audit, filing process and administrative process as well as I do.

I want you to understand the corporate culture there and that very infrequently is there an agent on the other side of the phone with your picture on a dart board in their cubicle.

I want you to know your options, your best next steps and that your long-term plan of action will not only help you resolve your tax situation but also keep you and the CRA happy.

I want you to know that in situations where I feel that you cannot do this alone, that I can help you, and will help you, make matters right, and I want you to know that a tax problem does not occur overnight and resolving them can take a long-time.

I have the knowledge and understanding that no-one else can claim to possess about the CRA collections policies and process and I don’t say that to boast, but rather to inform.  I don’t profess to have an “army” of “real” CRA staff with me, nor do I pretend that background is in any area other than where it shows on my web-site, blog, and on my LinkedIn profile.  Collections, collection, collections.

I’m also not going top pretend that a background in Appeals or Audit is going to help you better than a back ground in Collections.  To each their own.

I write my blog posts myself and where possible I cite everything I can to the CRA website so that you can be comfortable knowing that information you read on my social media platforms are sourced from the people who want you to pay your taxes and question your deductions and filing deadlines.

I don’t write my posts in order to scare anyone or to force them to use my services, because quite frankly, I want everyone to be able to navigate the Canadian tax system without ever having problems and running afoul of the CRA and in a perfect world, one day I’ll be able to provide a users guide to the CRA to allow people to file, re-file and pay without incurring penalties and / or interest and where the CRA understands why people can’t, won’t or are unable to do so and then have the CRA deal with them in an understanding manner.

But for now, we have to take it one day at a time, and one situation at a time.

The best day to start fixing tax problems is today.  There are always solutions and there are always options.  In deciding what you want to do, you need to make sure you are getting the right information and from the right sources.  Be wary of what you read on the Internet because it can make you want to close your blinds, change you name and hide from the CRA when all they want you to do is to close an account or file a nil return.

Get the facts!

inTAXicating Tax Services offers a free 15-minute consultation to determine how to best proceed with a tax situation.

From there if’s decided that a written plan of action is needed, I can produce one for you.

If from that, a decision is made to engage inTAXicating to represent you in your dealings with the CRA, then we determine if the hourly or fixed plan works best for you.

You don’t have to worry about opening those brown envelopes.  Help is here!

http://www.intaxicating.ca

http://www.intaxicating.wordpress.com

info@intaxicating.ca

Think the Canada Revenue Agency Treats Employees Differently? Think Again!

Former CRA employee fined and sentenced to 18-month conditional sentence for income tax evasion

Surrey, British Columbia.   The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) announced today that Maria Victoria Banhaw of Burnaby, British Columbia, was sentenced on October 3, 2014 in Vancouver Provincial Court, after pleading guilty to one count of income tax evasion. Banhaw was fined $47,580, representing 75% of the total federal income tax evaded. She was also ordered to serve an 18-month conditional sentence, which includes 9 months of house arrest.

A CRA investigation determined that Banhaw, while employed at the CRA, prepared and filed personal income tax returns for herself, her husband and 34 family members and friends for the 2005 to 2009 tax years. On these 96 returns, Banhaw overstated the amount of Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions in order to reduce taxable income and increase refund amounts payable. Banhaw’s family and friends were unaware that she made false claims on their returns. In total, Banhaw reported $389,417 in false RRSP contributions, resulting in $63,438 in taxes evaded.

The preceding information was obtained from the court records.

When taxpayers are convicted of income tax evasion, in addition to any fines, they must still repay the full amount of taxes owing, plus interest and any civil penalties that may be assessed by the CRA.  In addition, the court has the ability to fine them up to 200% of the taxes evaded and impose a jail term of up to five years.

If you have ever made a tax mistake or omission it is prudent to speak to us right away so that we can help you understand where you stand in the eyes of the CRA.  We will help you determine if you can handle it on your own – and set you up to do so, or recommend our services or the services of others to assist you through the process.

Unfortunately… Business is Booming!

Business is booming!

BOOM

I’m of two minds as I write this post.

First off, I am very excited that business is booming!  Emails never stop coming in, social media questions, posts, inquiries roll in, and my phone does not stop ringing, but on the other hand I’m a bit disturbed that business is booming because it means that there are a lot of people in tax trouble with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and they ALL need my help.

With that in mind, here are the 13 things about my tax solution business – and any other business offering tax services – that you need to know so that you can make an informed choice.

13. If you have a Revenue Canada collections problem, would it not make the most sense to take advice from a former Revenue Canada Collector?  Someone who collected taxes, knows the ins and outs of the policy, procedures and legislation?  How about if that person also served as a resource office whose job it was to prepare accounts for assessments and produce them to the Department of Justice?  And what if that person also led teams and managed staff and projects in Collections?  Then you would have the best possibly option representing your interests.  Welcome to inTAXicating.  That is what we do!

12.  Accountants are awesome, and they are busy and you hire them to do accounting work, so they may not have the time to spend on the phone with the CRA negotiating your arrangement or trying to remove a garnishment.  Or, they may get to a point where the CRA refuses to budge and you have no bank account to use.  That is simply not acceptable!

11.   I worked for the CRA for almost 11-years, and I started as an entry-level collector, worked my way up through collections and along the way I led teams, trained staff, and handled some of the most complex files in the Tax Office. I was the resource officer for 5-years, and the Employee of the Year in 2002.  I was their go-to guy, and I still am. I’ll tell you like it is, and I’ll tell the CRA like it is.

10.   If you have a tax / collections / CRA question, you can and should ask it here.  I can tell you what the CRA is doing, and most importantly what they are going to be doing in the near future.  Email me or send it through social media, and I’ll answer it personally.

9. Respect. Given… and Earned. I treat you with respect and I treat the CRA with respect, because nobody wants to work with a representative who calls them “taxman”.  Trust me.  Talk about starting a relationship off on the wrong foot…

8. I do not prepare tax returns. I will not recommend you go bankrupt, and I do not pretend to have an office of “former CRA agents” armed at your disposal.  What I do have is a wonderful relationship with the best tax lawyer in Toronto, the best mortgage broker, CA’s, bookkeepers, financial planner, trustee plus my actual network of former colleagues at the CRA at your disposal.

7. You can hire me for an hour-long meeting after which I will give you a written report of our discussion along with my recommended course of action and the CRA’s probable plan of action. I will also tell you if you can handle it, and at what point you need to circle back to me.

6. I will not take you on as a client if you do not need my services.  I have a reputation to uphold.

5. You can take advantage of my fixed fee service for the entire length of the tax problem(s) so that you have the piece of mind your matters are being dealt with and that when we speak that you are not on the clock. Questions need to be asked and answered, and resolving your tax problem is the only priority, not padding your bill.

4. Areas of expertise include; Collections, Enforcement, Liens, Director’s Liability assessments, S160 assessments, RTP’s, debt management, negotiation and not just limited to the CRA. I’ve fixed tax problems relating to Revenu Quebec, the IRS, Workers Comp (WSIB) and the CRTC.

3. My website sucks! Yes, it does because I’ve been too busy to provide the content to the web developer for correcting. I’m okay with it too, but I will be changing it, soon.   My thought is that it’s better to have an adequate static website and spend my time solving tax problems, than spend millions of dollars a month on advertising then having to increase my fees so that you can pay my bills.

2. Some of the terms used to describe me and the services I perform are; x-taxer, priceless, unbelievable, compassionate, and informative, just to list a few descriptions of me and my business.  I care.

1. I’m really good at what I do. I know the CRA better than they do, and I certainly know what the collectors can and cannot do.  I fix tax problems and I enjoy it.  I am passionate about tax.  You might say I’m slightly inTAXicated.

 

So whether you just received a tax notice that you are not 100% sure about, or if you have a long history of being in Collections at the CRA, I can help you understand what you need to do.  I can navigate you through a Director’s Liability assessment where I have saved firms hundred of thousands of dollars, or negotiate the removal of a lien so you can finalize a house sale or divorce.  I can have your tax returns re-filed with correct figures to reduce balances, or bring your payroll up-to-date.

Two weeks ago a phone question resulted in a corporation not having to pay a $350,000 liability due to statute of limitations, and last week an hour long meeting uncovered 10 plus years of fraud being committed on a business by their CA.

inTAXicating

http://www.intaxicating.ca

416.833.1581

info@intaxicating.ca

@intaxicating

http://www.facebook.com/intaxicating

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Toronto-based but Canada-wide!

Congratulations to inTAXicating for finishing 2nd in the 2013 Canadian Blog Awards!

I recently received word that this blog, inTAXicating, finished 2nd in the Legal / Professional category of the Canadian Blog Awards.2013 Canadian Blog Awards

The Canadian Blog Awards is an annual event on the Canadian Blogosphere in which Canadian Bloggers and Blog Readers vote to decide which blog is the best – either overall or within a category.

This year (2013), the Canadian Blog Awards are being operated by Jonathan Kleiman, a Toronto Small Claims Court Lawyer and Toronto Business Lawyer.

The first Canadian Blog Awards were held in 2004, by Robert McClelland of MyBlahg.  He hosted the awards for 2005 and 2006 before handing them over to a coalition of bloggers and business owners keen on recognizing Canadian blogging talent.

Aside from being thrilled at the nomination, I am excited and content with the 2nd place finish because it means that not only is there plenty of room for improvement, but that people understand that in order to help themselves save taxes, or fix tax troubles, they need to read online to see what the experts are recommending.

With the CRA moving more and more online in everything they do, it only makes sense that you, the taxpayer, keeps up to speed as well, or at the very least, read and learn from people who were on the inside… For a long time… And who grew up in that space, trained the staff in that space and led staff in that space.

Thank you for voting for this blog and for dropping by for tips, suggestions and recommendations on how to best handle your tax questions or tax problems.

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Make sure to visit http://www.intaxicating.ca but what you really want to do, is contact us at info@intaxicating.ca or by phone at 416.833.1581 to have your questions answered or to have your tax problems solved.

#x-taxer

Is the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) looking after your best interests?

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) does an adequate job at what they are mandated to do, and that is to collect tax revenue and tax information from taxpayers while using their debt management (collections) division to collect from the unwilling or pre-occupied.

From the inside the CRA trains the collectors to understand that those who do not file or pay are “debtors” and that actions should be taken to bring these debtors into compliance right away.

They are also trained that if you can collect from – or force into bankruptcy – these individuals and corporations, that you are doing them a service but forcing them to make decisions that they are unwilling or unable to make on their own.  You’re doing them a favour by putting them out of business.  You stop the “bleeding”.

Those of us who have worked in the “real world” understand that behind the account numbers and names there are real people who are trying to run real businesses and who find taxation either complicated or overbearing and cannot comply with the rules and regulations.

Since failure to comply with some tax laws can result in criminal actions, I believe that the tax rules are complicated and with little forgiveness on the party of the government, one small mistake can shut a business down, or result in significant monetary penalties.

The most frustrating part, I find, is trying to explain to the CRA that their actions – while justified internally – have serious implications on more than a business or a person.

Take for example one of my clients;

I spent the last week in serious discussions with just about everyone at the Winnipeg Tax Services Office, trying to convince then that if they keep a garnishment on a corporate bank account that they will shut down this corporation.

The corporation’s issue, which the collector, team leader, technical advisor, section manager and director felt justified these actions?

They were in collections for 2-years. They had a trust exam and fell behind.

GASP.

I mentioned the accounts I am resolving for them right now involving people and corporations in collections for 15-20 years. 2-years is a drop in the bucket.

I also let them know of the tragic circumstances surrounding this corporation involving a death, an illness and a mass exodus of employees which left one director now trying to keep his corporation alive. That was until the CRA placed the garnishment and wanted to shut down the corporation.

So the collector – new – and the technical advisor – new – find words to justify their actions and the director did not return my calls or letters (yet, apparently) did not feel compelled enough to get back to me and intervene.

The CRA’s solution instead of putting 3 employees out of jobs, and a family man without income to support his young family was to drag out the process and ask for a payment arrangement on a corporation with no income… From their actions.

So whose interests are the CRA looking after?

Theirs?

No.

By not allowing the corporation to operate and earn income they are going to lose out on revenue to pay their liability.

Or when the CRA finally “allows” the business to continue operations and removes the Requirement to Pay from the business bank account, the CRA fails to take into consideration that the business will now need to back back rent, phone bills, internet bills, and likely replenish inventory before they have any funds abailable to pat themselves or the CRA anything.

Is the CRA then looking after the best intentions of the corporations?

Heck no!

By not being able to operate and by stringing along the director, this corporation is bleeding a slow death. Customers are losing faith, employees are quitting or being laid off, and with no money, the corporation cannot afford to fight any more.

It becomes very clear at this point that the CRA is looking after no one’s interests.

The CRA takes actions which are told to them from people who have no concept of reality.  Their actions are destructive and cause more damage than good, most of the time.  They don’t understand that sometimes, no action is the very best action.

Frustrating?

Absolutely it is.

In our specific case, after one whole week of trying to talk sense into the CRA, the collector agreed to lift the garnishment today.  Instead of receiving a payment, however, the CRA will get a plan on how this corporation plans to recover from a poorly executed collection action which got the CRA one payment and now nothing for at least a month.

At the end of the day, because of our involvement, everybody is going to win, but my job would be so much easier if the CRA understood that they need to listen to the experts and let the account resolve itself.

We all would be so much further ahead – the corporations director might have actually slept in the past month – if the CRA had slowly taken actions to remedy the situation rather than freezing the business bank account and not telling the business owner why they were trying to shut him down.

I’m looking out for the corporation’s best interests.  I’m also looking after the best interest of the CRA because we all need them on our side, and not against us.

Someone has to!

The Biggest Taxation No-No’s. EVER!

Canada Revenue Agency
Canada Revenue Agency (Photo credit: John Bristowe)

Working in the Canada Revenue Agency for almost 11-years, I learned a thing or two about how the CRA operates as well as what is a red flag for them and what the CRA often let’s slide.  It helps when I negotiate with them that I know their policies, procedures and how to navigate their systems as well as they do, or even better.  I’ve used this knowledge to help my clients save millions of dollars of taxes.

With that in mind, I want to help you save unnecessary expenses, so I decided to reveal the 8 Biggest Taxation No-No’s EVER.

8.  Try and do it yourself.  Taxation is a complicated topic for many and if you don’t live and breathe tax then you should consider either hiring someone to help you along or at the very least hire someone to set you up correctly and who will take the time to learn about you and your business so that you are getting all of the tax deductions and credits available to you all the time.

7.  Think that you are above taxation.   Everyone pays taxes no matter their income level; whether it be income tax, payroll tax, or consumption tax.  To think that there is a magic “Pay no tax” card is a huge mistake and the CRA does not take “detaxers” or the underground economy lightly..

6.  Brag about not paying taxes / scamming the government.  Our tax system here in Canada is a self-assessing system with the government’s responsibility being the checks and balances.  It’s not that they don’t trust you but… They don’t trust you, which is why they have huge departments responsible for catching the tax cheats.  If the government doesn’t get you, your ego might;

5.  Post information online about yourself or your business and think that the government will not see it and use it against you.   The “government” are a bunch of people like you and I who are trying to make a living.  If you claim you are suffering from financial hardship yet post pictures on Facebook showing yourself living it up, or if you claim to be Canadian and your profile states that you are born in the US, the collectors or auditors will find it and us it against you.

4.  File late, miss installment payments or fail to make remittances.  All this will do is add penalties and interest onto your tax account and there are very few excuses the government will accept to have them reversed or cancelled.   Many large tax debts start in just this way.

3.  Carry a balance.  If at all possible it is critical to make sure that you do not carry a balance with the CRA.  With interest being charged at a floating rate of just over 10%, compounding daily, your balance can grow at a shocking rate.  The CRA is not a bank and you should not think it’s okay to treat their debt as a bank loan.

2.  Don’t be afraid to search online for your tax advice.  Not only has the CRA moved to strengthen their online presence but there are a lot of professionals online who have posted their experiences with the CRA and steps they took to resolve tax problems for themselves and their clients.  Anyone suggestion otherwise is doing so to avoid you from finding out there are other – better – tax solution providers in Canada.

1.  Thinking that anyone can help you.  This is the absolute biggest tax no-no I have encountered in 17-years of taxation.  If you have an electrical problem at home, do you call a plumber?  Would you ask a dentist to perform open-heart surgery?  How about asking a former auditor to help you with a collections problem, or an appeals officer to help you correct your payroll nanny account issues?  How about going to an Insolvency firm to have a lien removed from you house which was placed there by CRA collections?

It doesn’t make sense but don’t get me wrong.  If you have created a tax crime, such as tax evasion,  you will need a tax lawyer, and if you need tax returns prepared, they need to be done by an accountant, and a former CRA auditor is the right solution if you have a difficult, complex corporate tax audit underway,

In taxation it is critical that you have experience on your side when you work to resolve your tax issues and understanding the way the CRA operates is more important than you could imagine.

Tax debts begin with audit or compliance issues.

Then they go to collections.

Collections leads to enforcement – garnishments, requirements to pay (RTP), liens, seizures, director’s liability, and much more.

You need experienced former collections staff to help you, and with almost 11-years of progressive collections experience in all areas, from collector to resource officer, to team leader, believe me when I say that experience helps!

When your representative knows more than the collector, or trained that collector, you know you have the best representation possible.

To leave your $250,000 tax liability to anyone else would keep me up at night too.