IRS Indoor Tanning Excise Tax comes into effect July 1st, 2010.

IRS 10% excise tax on indoor tanning industry.

If you live in, or visit America, and love that fake, baked-on tan, it’s going to cost you 10% more to get that well-done feeling, as of July 1st.

The IRS issued regulations outlining the administration of a 10% excise tax on indoor tanning services that goes into effect on July 1st, 2010.
The regulations were published today in the Federal Register.
In general, providers of indoor tanning services will collect the tax at the time the purchaser pays for the tanning services. The provider then pays over these amounts to the government, quarterly, along with IRS Form 720, Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return.
The tax does not apply to phototherapy services performed by a licensed medical professional on his or her premises. The regulations also provide an exception for certain physical fitness facilities that offer tanning as an incidental service to members without a separately identifiable fee.

Hmmmm. Taxing the tanning industry?!? I guess that may push people out into the sunlight more often, which may not be such a bad idea considering all the debate about how dangerous tanning beds are and their suspected link to cancer. Then again, if the IRS could tax natural sunlight, trust me, you would be paying it too.

New Electronic Filing Requirements for GST Coming…

With the implementation of the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST), effective July 1, 2010, some registrants will be required to file their GST/HST returns electronically.

This will differ from the current paper filing system that most registrants use and will affect registrants currently filing their returns quarterly or monthly.

For reporting periods ending after June 30, 2010, GST/HST registrants will be required to file their returns electronically if they:

  • have annual taxable supplies (on an associated group basis) exceeding $1.5 million (charities excepted);
  • are referred to as “large businesses” and are required to recapture input tax credits (ITCs) for the provincial portion of the HST on certain expense categories; or
  • are builders that must report:

– transitional tax adjustments;

– transitional new housing rebates (provincial portion of HST);

– sales of grandparented housing (i.e., ownership and possession transferred to purchaser after June 30, 2010, under written agreements of purchase and sale entered into before June 19, 2009) if the purchaser is not entitled to claim GST/HST new housing or new residential rental property rebates; or

– housing sales that are subject to HST, if the builder purchased housing on a grandparented basis.
The recapture of ITCs and the transitional taxes applicable to builders will be reported in separate information fields on a schedule that accompanies the GST/HST return. For registrants affected by the ITC restrictions, the restricted or recaptured ITCs will be calculated as:

Failure to file GST/HST returns electronically may result in penalties being imposed by the Canada Revenue Agency.