CRA Taxpayer Relief Information Moved from cra.gc.ca to canada.ca

Looking for information related to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Taxpayer Relief Program?

It’s moved!

Here is the information that matters! Link is at the bottom.

Taxpayer Relief.

Important note: A request for relief from penalty and / or interest amounts does not stop or suspend collection activity on an account or the accrual of interest.

Information you must include with your request

It is important that you provide the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) with a complete and accurate description of the circumstances to explain why your situation merits relief.

In order to support a request, you should provide all relevant information including the following, where applicable:
• your name, address, and telephone number;
• your social insurance number (SIN), account number, partnership number, trust account number, business number (BN), or any other identification number assigned to you by the CRA;
• the tax year(s) or fiscal period(s) involved;
• the facts and reasons supporting that the interest or penalty were either mainly caused by factors beyond your control, or were the result of actions by the CRA;
• an explanation of how the circumstances affected your ability to meet your tax obligations;
• the facts and reasons supporting your inability to pay the penalties or interest assessed or charged, or to be assessed or charged;
• any relevant supporting documentation such as death certificates, doctor’s statements, or insurance statements;
• in cases involving an inability to pay or financial hardship, full financial disclosure including a statement of income, expenses, assets, and liabilities (to help individuals provide full financial disclosure);
• supporting details of incorrect information given by the CRA in the form of written answers, published information, other evidence; or when the incorrect information given by the CRA is of a verbal nature, you should give all possible details such as date, time, name of CRA official spoken to, and details of the conversation; or
• a complete history of events including any measures that have been taken, e.g., payments and payment arrangements, and when they were taken to resolve the non-compliance.

Note: You may submit photocopies of supporting documents. During the course of our review, the CRA may contact you if they need additional information or documentation, however that is not common.

Other considerations
• Indicate with your request if this is the first or second review request. A second review request is when you ask the CRA to reconsider its original decision.
You must include Form RC4288, Request for Taxpayer Relief – Cancel or Waive Penalties or Interest to make a request to cancel penalties or interest.

You can also write a letter marked “Taxpayer Relief”.

Submitting the Application

You can submit your request to cancel penalties and / or interest and all supporting documents:
• online at My Account, My Business Account, or Represent a Client, by selecting the “Submit documents” service; or
• by mail at one of the designated offices below.
For more information on the Submit Documents online service, go to Submit documents online.

Designated offices:
• British Columbia and Yukon
Vancouver Tax Services Office
9755 King George Boulevard
Surrey BC V3T 5E1
• Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut
Winnipeg Tax Centre
66 Stapon Road
Winnipeg MB R3C 3M2
• Ontario, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, PEI, Newfoundland and Labrador
Prince Edward Island Tax Centre
275 Pope Road
Summerside PE C1N 6A2
• Quebec
Shawinigan-Sud Tax Centre
4695 Shawinigan-Sud Boulevard
Shawinigan QC G9P 5H9
• Non-resident or international taxpayers (individual, corporation, trust, and part XIII and non-resident withholding accounts)
International and Ottawa Tax Services Office
P.O. Box 9769, Station T
Ottawa ON K1G 3Y4
CANADA

 

Link to CRA website: 
https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/forms-publications/forms/rc4288-request-taxpayer-relief-cancel-waive-penalties-interest.html

 

inTAXicating – Your Canadian Taxpayer Relief experts!  Don’t believe us?  Contact us and find out why!  info@inTAXicating.ca

 

Advertisements

Happy Canada Day! Don’t Forget About Taxation!

Happy Canada Day, Canada.  You don’t look a day over 150-years-old!

Happy 150th Birthday Canada!

There are so many things to be thankful of this Canada Day, beginning with Tim Horton’s and hockey and ending with socialized medicine and peace.  But in between there is a whole lot of taxation.  Taxes you pay which go to build new arenas, which pay for medicine, which support the troops who keep us safe, and fund programs which integrates youth of all backgrounds, races, religions and income levels together in order to keep violence as low as possible.

These are the taxes we cannot avoid paying – unless we stop spending – and they are the consumption taxes (GST/HST), gas tax, liquor tax, and many more, and there are taxes on wealth, like personal income tax, as well as Corporate taxes.  There are also payroll taxes and any other fee, levy or revenue tool (all taxes but given a different name).

For the most part, these taxes are unavoidable, and as Canadians we pay them knowing that money goes back into the economy and helps people.

What I do not understand, however, is why people pay more taxes than they are required to pay, or can afford to pay, and these taxes are viewed by people in the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) as a “stupid” or “lazy” tax and what they are referring to are penalties and interest.

It is my belief that no one should pay any penalties or interest.  Ever.  Why give the CRA more money than they are seeking through the Income Tax Act or the Excise Tax Act.

If you work with an accountant or tax preparer, there should be no reason for late filings or late remittances, or for missing out on key deductions because that representative should know you, and the industry you work in, and be able to keep you current and free of penalties and interest.

But there are many legitimate reasons why people file late, and incur penalties and watch interest accrue on their tax accounts, and these people are then hammered by the CRA and need help, which is why I created inTAXicating.  My goal here is to help you get out of the troubles that you have gotten into and by help, I mean rehabilitate you and get you current on your filings, help you reduce your balance owing, apply for taxpayer relief (fairness) if it applies to you, and get you on a remitting and reporting schedule which ensures you are never late again.

Too many firms out there have watered down the “Tax Solution” process to the point where you pay them a ton of money, they “fix” your issue and then another one pops up, all because they are experts in taking money and not experts in resolving CRA debt issues.

The best part about working with inTAXicating is having the expertise where you need it.  If your problem is with collections or enforcement then you need the person who worked in that area, and trained and managed the collectors and who can tell you the CRA’s next move before they can.

Being audited?  Recently assessed?  Don’t understand a letter?  Balance looks too high?

There is no tax situation too scary, or too difficult to figure out.  Business taxes, personal taxes, GST/HST, payroll, T2’s, provincial, federal, liens, RTP’s, appeals, VDP… We’ve seen it all, handled it all, and have been successful with it all.

Just because it’s July 1st and summertime doesn’t mean the CRA stops working too.  In fact, it’s the opposite.  With more time on their hands, the CRA’s collections staff have the time to thoroughly research tax files which have balances on them to see what they can do to ge the account paid in full.

My experience working in the CRA for almost 11-years, tells me that the majority of in depth investigations occurs during the summer months.

Make summertime the best time to resolve that nagging tax problem.

If you have a tax problem, we have a tax solution.

inTAXicating is a part of Goldhar Tax Solutions, and you can find us at http://www.goldhartaxsolutions.ca

You can also find us on twitter @GoldharTAX, or call us at 647.812.0181, or Toll Free @ 1.877.TAX.AID1 (1.877.829.2431)

Or email us: Tax@Goldhar.ca

 

What are you waiting for?

The Horse and Pony Protection Association (HAPPA) Sought Voluntary Revocation of Charitable Status From CRA

The voluntary revocation of the registered charitable status of The Horse and Pony Protection Association (HAPPA) as a result of a CBC investigation could leave Canadian Taxpayers who donated to this organization owing back monies to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

Almost one year ago, the CBC Investigates reported on accountability issues at the Newfoundland charity after former members of the Board of Directors raised concerns about the operation of the group, which at the time continued to take donations from the public 18 months after closing its flagship horse sanctuary.

As a result of strict confidentiality guidelines, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) are unable to say who made the request to have HAPPA’s charitable status removed, however after the CBC investigation was published, the website was removed, and further investigation turned up a significant breach in reporting requirements on behalf of the charity as it would appear that they filed incorrect information with federal charity regulators, claiming that all board members are “arm’s length” from each other.

According to the CBC, the only current active members of the Horse and Pony Protection Association (HAPPA) board are what appear to be a mother and daughter and what appear to be a long-time couple.

Family members and common-law partners are considered “not at arm’s length” by the Canada Revenue Agency — something that can affect how the agency assesses a charity’s status.

Charities are required to file a form outlining those relationships and the CBC reported that on HAPPA’s website they found their filing for the year ending December 31st, 2011 in which there were 8 directors listed as being “at arm’s length” from each other.

The significance of the revocation of charitable status is that anyone who donated to the charity after that date, will not be allowed to claim the donation as a deduction from their income. If they do so anyway, the CRA will re-assess them plus penalties and interest. The Taxpayer Relief program will not granted penalty and or interest relief to those who donated to this charity, and in situations like these, as there are no categories to apply under.

Once the revoked, the charity should have transferred all of its remaining property — including cash — to an eligible donee, or be subjected to a revocation tax equal to the property’s full value.

If you have donated to this organization and are concerned that the CRA may disallow the charitable receipt, it is best to not submit it with your taxes. You have 4 years to claim charitable deductions.

Is the CRA Looking After Your Best Interest? Theirs? Or No Ones???

I have always felt that the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) does an adequate job at what they are mandated to do, and that is to collect tax revenue and tax information from taxpayers while using their debt management (collections) division to collect from the unwilling or pre-occupied.

From the inside you are trained to understand that those who do not file or pay are “debtors” and that actions should be taken to bring these debtors into compliance right away.

You are also trained that if you can collect from – or force into bankruptcy – these individuals and corporations, that you are doing them a service but forcing them to make decisions that they are unwilling to make or unable to make.

Those of us who have worked in the “real world” understand that behind the account numbers and names there are real people who are trying to run real businesses and who find taxation either complicated or overbearing and cannot comply with the rules and regulations.

Since failure to comply can result in criminal actions, I believe that the tax rules are complicated and with little forgiveness on the party of the government, one small mistake can shut a business down, or result in significant monetary penalties.

The most frustrating part, I find, is trying to explain to the CRA that their actions – while justified internally – have serious implications on more than a business or a person.

Take for example one of my clients;

I spent the last week in serious discussions with just about everyone at the Winnipeg Tax Services Office, trying to convince then that if they keep a garnishment on a corporate bank account that they will shut down this corporation.

The corporation’s issue, which the collector, team leader, technical advisor, section manager and director felt justified these actions?

They were in collections for 2-years. They had a trust exam and fell behind.

GASP.

I mentioned the accounts I am resolving for them right now involving people and corporations in collections for 15-20 years. 2-years is a drop in the bucket.

I also let them know of the tragic circumstances surrounding this corporation involving a death, an illness and a mass exodus of employees which left one director now trying to keep his corporation alive. That was until the CRA placed the garnishment and wanted to shut down the corporation.

So the collector – new – and the technical advisor – new – find words to justify their actions and the director did not return my calls or letters (yet, apparently) did not feel compelled enough to get back to me and intervene.

The CRA’s solution instead of putting 3 employees out of jobs, and a family man without income to support his young family was to drag out the process and ask for a payment arrangement on a corporation with no income… From their actions.

So whose interests are the CRA looking after?

Theirs? Nope. By not allowing the corporation to operate and earn income they are going to lose out on revenue to pay their liability. When they do open up the account, the corporation will need to pay back rent, phones, internet, and buy stock before either paying themselves or the CRA.

Are they looking after the corporations interests? Heck no! By not being able to operate and by stringing along the director, this corporation is bleeding a slow death. Customers are losing faith, employees are quitting and with no money, the corporation cannot afford to fight any more.

So it is very clear at this point that the CRA is looking after no one’s interests. Their actions are destructive and they are too far from the real world to understand that in this case no action is the very best action.

Frustrating?

Absolutely.

So after one whole week of trying to talk sense into the CRA, I am hopeful that the garnishment comes off the account today. The CRA will get a plan on how this corporation plans to recover from a poorly executed collection actions which will get them one payment and nothing for at least a month.

The end game here will benefit everyone now that I am involved, but my job would be so much easier if the CRA understood that they need to listen to the experts and let the account resolve itself.

I would be so much father ahead than we are now and the poor director would have slept at least one night in the past month instead of trying to figure out why the CRA is trying to shut them down.

I’m looking out for the corporation’s best interests!

Someone has to!