From PWC Tax: Canadian corporate and personal tax rates on your Blackberry

Thanks to our friends at PWC Tax, you can now get notification of tax rate changes sent directly to your Blackberry. This is going to save quite a lot of time investigating current rates.

Here is the PWC email that came out;

“Whether you’re sitting in a budget meeting, considering the sale of an asset, or just want a quick fact – our free Blackberry app will give you access to Canadian and provincial corporate tax rates and personal tax rates right at your fingertips. We’ve built upon the success of our annual Tax Facts and Figures publication to bring you up-to-date tax rate information, no matter where you are.

Click http://appworld.blackberry.com/webstore/content/28203?lang=en to download the PwC Tax Rates app onto your hand-held device.”

Advertisements

IRS Kicks Off 2011 Tax Season with Deadline Extended to April 18

Taxpayers Impacted by Recent Tax Breaks Can File Starting in Mid- to Late February.

The following press release came out today, January 4th, 2011 from the IRS.

WASHINGTON — The IRS today opened the 2011 tax filing season by announcing that taxpayers have until Monday, April 18 to file their 2010 tax returns and pay any tax due because Emancipation Day, a holiday observed in the District of Columbia, falls this year on Friday, April 15.

By law, District of Columbia holidays impact tax deadlines in the same way that federal holidays do; therefore, all taxpayers will have three extra days to file this year.

Taxpayers requesting an extension will have until Oct. 17 to file their 2010 tax returns.

The IRS expects to receive more than 140 million individual tax returns this year, with most of those being filed by the April 18 deadline.

So who must wait to file their returns?

For most taxpayers, the 2011 tax filing season starts on schedule. However, tax law changes enacted by Congress and signed by President Obama in December mean some people need to wait until mid- to late February to file their tax returns in order to give the IRS time to reprogram its processing systems.

Some taxpayers – including those who itemize deductions on Form 1040 Schedule A – will need to wait to file. This includes taxpayers impacted by any of three tax provisions that expired at the end of 2009 and were renewed by the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act Of 2010 enacted Dec. 17. Those who need to wait to file include:
• Taxpayers Claiming Itemized Deductions on Schedule A. Itemized deductions include mortgage interest, charitable deductions, medical and dental expenses as well as state and local taxes. In addition, itemized deductions include the state and local general sales tax deduction that was also extended and which primarily benefits people living in areas without state and local income taxes. Because of late Congressional action to enact tax law changes, anyone who itemizes and files a Schedule A will need to wait to file until mid- to late February.
• Taxpayers Claiming the Higher Education Tuition and Fees Deduction. This deduction for parents and students – covering up to $4,000 of tuition and fees paid to a post-secondary institution – is claimed on Form 8917. However, the IRS emphasized that there will be no delays for millions of parents and students who claim other education credits, including the American Opportunity Tax Credit extended last month and the Lifetime Learning Credit.
• Taxpayers Claiming the Educator Expense Deduction. This deduction is for kindergarten through grade 12 educators with out-of-pocket classroom expenses of up to $250. The educator expense deduction is claimed on Form 1040, Line 23 and Form 1040A, Line 16.
In addition to extending those tax deductions for 2010, the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act also extended those deductions for 2011 and a number of other tax deductions and credits for 2011 and 2012 such as the American Opportunity Tax Credit and the modified Child Tax Credit, which help families pay for college and other child-related expenses. The Act also provides various job creation and investment incentives including 100% expensing and a 2% payroll tax reduction for 2011. Those changes have no effect on the 2011 filing season.

The IRS will announce a specific date in the near future when it can start processing tax returns impacted by the recent tax law changes. In the interim, taxpayers affected by these tax law changes can start working on their tax returns, but they should NOT submit their returns until IRS systems are ready to process the new tax law changes.

Additional information will be available at http://www.IRS.gov.

For taxpayers who must wait before filing, the delay affects both paper filers AND electronic filers.

The IRS urges taxpayers to use e-file instead of paper tax forms to minimize confusion over the recent tax law changes and ensure accurate tax returns.

Except for those facing a delay, the IRS will begin accepting e-file and Free File returns on Jan. 14.

IRS Releases 2011 Tax Rates

Below is the IRS press release identifying the 2011 Adjusted tax rates, effective January 1, 2011.

SECTION 1. PURPOSE
This revenue procedure sets forth inflation adjusted items for 2011. Other inflation adjusted items for 2011 are in Rev. Proc. 2010-40, 2010-46 I.R.B. 663 (dated November 15, 2010).

SECTION 2. 2011 ADJUSTED ITEMS
Tax Rate Tables.

For taxable years beginning in 2011, the tax rate tables under § 1 are as follows:
TABLE 1 – Section 1(a) – Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns and Surviving Spouses
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $17,000 10% of the taxable income
Over $17,000 but $1,700 plus 15% of
not over $69,000 the excess over $17,000
Over $69,000 but $9,500 plus 25% of
not over $139,350 the excess over $69,000
Over $139,350 but $27,087.50 plus 28% of
not over $212,300 the excess over $139,350
Over $212,300 but $47,513.50 plus 33% of
not over $379,150 the excess over $212,300
Over $379,150 $102,574 plus 35% of
the excess over $379,150

TABLE 2 – Section 1(b) – Heads of Households
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $12,150 10% of the taxable income
Over $12,150 but $1,215 plus 15% of
not over $46,250 the excess over $12,150
Over $46,250 but $6,330 plus 25% of
not over $119,400 the excess over $46,250
Over $119,400 but $24,617.50 plus 28% of
not over $193,350 the excess over $119,400
Over $193,350 but $45,323.50 plus 33% of
not over $379,150 the excess over $193,350
Over $379,150 $106,637.50 plus 35% of
the excess over $379,150

TABLE 3 – Section 1(c) – Unmarried Individuals (other than Surviving Spouses and Heads of Households)

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $8,500 10% of the taxable income
Over $8,500 but $850 plus 15% of
not over $34,500 the excess over $8,500
Over $34,500 but $4,750 plus 25% of
not over $83,600 the excess over $34,500
Over $83,600 but $17,025 plus 28% of
not over $174,400 the excess over $83,600
Over $174,400 but $42,449 plus 33% of
not over $379,150 the excess over $174,400
Over $379,150 $110,016.50 plus 35% of
the excess over $379,150

TABLE 4 – Section 1(d) – Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $8,500 10% of the taxable income
Over $8,500 but $850 plus 15% of
not over $34,500 the excess over $8,500
Over $34,500 but $4,750 plus 25% of
not over $69,675 the excess over $34,500
Over $69,675 but $13,543.75 plus 28% of
not over $106,150 the excess over $69,675
Over $106,150 but $23,756.75 plus 33% of
not over $189,575 the excess over $106,150
Over $189,575 $51,287 plus 35% of
the excess over $189,575

TABLE 5 – Section 1(e) – Estates and Trusts
If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
Not over $2,300 15% of the taxable income
Over $2,300 but $345 plus 25% of
not over $5,450 the excess over $2,300
Over $5,450 but $1,132.50 plus 28% of
not over $8,300 the excess over $5,450
Over $8,300 but $1,930.50 plus 33% of
not over $11,350 the excess over $8,300
Over $11,350 $2,937 plus 35% of
the excess over $11,350

Child Tax Credit.

For taxable years beginning in 2011, the value used in § 24(d)(1)(B)(i) to determine the amount of credit under § 24 that may be refundable is $3,000.

Hope Scholarship, American Opportunity, and Lifetime Learning Credits.
(1) For taxable years beginning in 2011, the Hope Scholarship Credit under
§ 25A(b)(1), as increased under § 25A(i) (the American Opportunity Tax Credit), is an amount equal to 100 percent of qualified tuition and related expenses not in excess of $2,000 plus 25 percent of those expenses in excess of $2,000, but not in excess of $4,000. Accordingly, the maximum Hope Scholarship Credit allowable under § 25A(b)(1) for taxable years beginning in 2011 is $2,500.
(2) For taxable years beginning in 2011, a taxpayer’s modified adjusted gross income in excess of $80,000 ($160,000 for a joint return) is used to determine the reduction under § 25A(d)(2) in the amount of the Hope Scholarship Credit otherwise allowable under § 25A(a)(1). For taxable years beginning in 2011, a taxpayer’s modified adjusted gross income in excess of $51,000 ($102,000 for a joint return) is used to determine the reduction under § 25A(d)(2) in the amount of the Lifetime Learning Credit otherwise allowable under § 25A(a)(2).

Earned Income Credit.
(1) In general. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the following amounts are used to determine the earned income credit under § 32(b). The “earned income amount” is the amount of earned income at or above which the maximum amount of the earned income credit is allowed. The “threshold phaseout amount” is the amount of adjustedgross income (or, if greater, earned income) above which the maximum amount of the credit begins to phase out. The “completed phaseout amount” is the amount of adjusted gross income (or, if greater, earned income) at or above which no credit is allowed. The threshold phaseout amounts and the completed phaseout amounts shown in the table below for married taxpayers filing a joint return include the increase provided in § 32(b)(3)(B)(i), as adjusted for inflation for taxable years beginning in 2011.

Number of Qualifying Children
Item One Two Three or More None
Earned Income $9,100 $12,780 $12,780 $6,070
Amount
Maximum Amount of Credit $3,094 $5,112 $5,751 $464
Threshold Phaseout $16,690 $16,690 $16,690 $7,590
Amount (Single, Surviving Spouse, or Head of Household) Completed Phaseout $36,052 $40,964 $43,998 $13,660
Amount (Single, Surviving Spouse, or Head of Household) Threshold Phaseout $21,770 $21,770 $21,770 $12,670
Amount (Married Filing Jointly)Completed Phaseout $41,132 $46,044 $49,078 $18,740
Amount (Married Filing Jointly)
The instructions for the Form 1040 series provide tables showing the amount of the earned income credit for each type of taxpayer.
(2) Excessive investment income. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the earned income tax credit is not allowed under § 32(i) if the aggregate amount of certain investment income exceeds $3,150.

Standard Deduction.
(1) In general. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the standard deduction amounts under § 63(c)(2) are as follows:
Filing Status Standard Deduction
Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns $11,600
and Surviving Spouses (§ 1(a))
Heads of Households (§ 1(b)) $8,500
Unmarried Individuals (other than Surviving Spouses $5,800
and Heads of Households) (§ 1(c))
Married Individuals Filing Separate $5,800
Returns (§ 1(d))
(2) Dependent. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the standard deduction amount under § 63(c)(5) for an individual who may be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer cannot exceed the greater of (1) $950, or (2) the sum of $300 and the individual’s earned income.
(3) Aged or blind. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the additional standard deduction amount under § 63(f) for the aged or the blind is $1,150. These amounts are increased to $1,450 if the individual is also unmarried and not a surviving spouse.

Qualified Transportation Fringe. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the monthly limitation under § 132(f)(2)(A), regarding the aggregate fringe benefit exclusion amount for transportation in a commuter highway vehicle and any transit pass, and under
§ 132(f)(2)(B), regarding the fringe benefit exclusion amount for qualified parking, is $230.

Personal Exemption.
(1) Exemption amount. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the personal exemption amount under § 151(d) is $3,700.

Interest on Education Loans. For taxable years beginning in 2011, the $2,500 maximum deduction for interest paid on qualified education loans under § 221 begins to phase out under § 221(b)(2)(B) for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income in excess of $60,000 ($120,000 for joint returns), and is completely phased out for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of $75,000 or more ($150,000 or more for joint returns).

SECTION 3. EFFECTIVE DATE
This revenue procedure applies to taxable years beginning in 2011.

What is better than You Tube and the IRS…

Well, pretty much everything, I think.  Unless you are a die-hard tax person like us folks here at In-tax-icating, then you are going to click this link and run (don’t walk) over to You Tube to watch IRS videos…

You know you want to!

http://www.youtube.com/irsvideos

Withholding, Roth IRA’s and Part XIII

Last week I was approached by a CEO of a very large US Corporation who was questioning the need to have withholding tax taken off his dividend payment, when the funds were earmarked for his Roth IRA.

From pervious communication on this matter I knew there should be no withholding, but I wanted something more concrete to put on my website in order to have for nay future queries and to educate all of you who look for an answer.

So I called the CRA international office and they confirmed that the dividend paid to U.S. holder who registered in Individual Retirement Accounts (“IRAs) are not subject to Part XIII (non-resident withholding) tax.

Also they advised me that there is no specific document regarding IRAs provided on CRA website.

Please see below statement from Canada – U.S income tax convention:

http://www.fin.gc.ca/treaties-conventions/USA_1-eng.asp

ARTICLE 13
3. For the purposes of this Convention:
(a) The term “pensions” includes any payment under a superannuation, pension or other retirement arrangement, Armed Forces retirement pay, war veterans pensions and allowances and amounts paid under a sickness, accident or disability plan, but does not include payments under an income-averaging annuity contract or, except for the purposes of Article XIX (Government Service), any benefit referred to in paragraph 5; and
(b) The term “pensions” also includes a Roth IRA, within the meaning of section 408A of the Internal Revenue Code, or a plan or arrangement created pursuant to legislation enacted by a Contracting State after September 21, 2007 that the competent authorities have agreed is similar thereto. Notwithstanding the provisions of the preceding sentence, from such time that contributions have been made to the Roth IRA or similar plan or arrangement, by or for the benefit of a resident of the other Contracting State (other than rollover contributions from a Roth IRA or similar plan or arrangement described in the previous sentence that is a pension within the meaning of this subparagraph), to the extent of accretions from such time, such Roth IRA or similar plan or arrangement shall cease to be considered a pension for purposes of the provisions of this Article.

Now you know!

Tax Treaty signed between Canada and the Republic of Namibia

The Department of Finance has announced that a tax treaty between Canada and the Republic of Namibia for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion was signed on March 25, 2010, in Windhoek.

The treaty limits the rate of withholding tax to 5% for dividends between affiliated companies and 15% for dividends in all other cases, and 10% for interest and royalties.

The treaty will enter into force once both countries have taken the necessary ratification measures and have notified each other of such ratification.

The full text of the treaty can be found on the Department of finance website.

http://www.fin.gc.ca/treaties-conventions/namibia-eng.asp

This treaty is NOT in full force yet.

Mutual Funds and Cost Basis Reporting

With each sale or exchange of mutual fund shares, you may realize a capital gain or loss that must be reported to the IRS.  To calculate gains and losses, you need to determine which shares were sold and the cost basis of those shares.

The sales proceeds minus the cost basis of the shares is your gain or loss.

The IRS permits the following methods of accounting for mutual fund cost basis:

1. First-In, First-Out (FIFO) Method

The FIFO method is the most common way of computing a basis. If you do not specify that another method is being used, the IRS will presume you are using the FIFO method.  As the name implies, the oldest shares available (first-in) are those considered sold first (first-out).

2. Specific Identification Method

The specific identification method allows you to choose which shares you are selling, thereby giving you more control over whether you will generate a gain or loss by the transaction. To use this method, you must specify to the mutual fund at the time of sale the particular shares to be sold. Your gain or loss will vary, depending on which shares you choose.

3. Average Cost – Single and Double Category

You may elect to calculate the cost basis of your mutual fund shares using an average price. There are some special requirements if you wish to do so. The IRS requires you to elect this method by stating so on your tax return and by using the method consistently for all your accounts in the same fund. The choice is effective until you get permission from the IRS to revoke it. These methods may be appealing for shareholders who redeem shares infrequently.

The single category method averages all shares owned at the time of sale.

In determining the holding period, the IRS considers the shares sold to be those shares acquired first (i.e., first-in, first-out).

The double category method requires you to divide all shares owned at the time of sale into two categories (long- and short-term) and calculate an average cost for each category. Shares held one year or less are short-term. Shares held longer than one year are long-term.

Similar to the specific identification method, you may specify to the fund at the time of sale from which category you wish to sell shares. If no specification is made, you must first charge the shares sold against the long-term category and then any remaining shares sold against the short-term category.

Wash Sale Rule

If you sell shares at a loss and purchase shares in the same fund within 30 days before or after the sale, the IRS considers the purchase to have “washed” all or a portion of your loss. The IRS designed this rule to discourage investors from selling securities solely for the purpose of generating a tax loss. A wash sale is indicated on your statement.

In the case of a wash sale, two important adjustments must be made. All or a portion of the loss must be deferred and added back to the basis, and the holding period of the purchased shares must be changed to account for the deferral. Your statement already reflects the adjusted cost basis and allowable loss. You need not make any further adjustments.