IRS Qualified Intermediary (QI) – Know Your Client Rules

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List of Approved Know-Your-Client Rules

Revenue Procedure 2000-12 states that the IRS will not enter into a qualified intermediary (QI) withholding agreement that provides for the use of documentary evidence obtained under a country’s know-your-customer rules if it has not received the know-your-customer practices and procedures for opening accounts and responses to 18 specific questions listed in the revenue procedure.This document lists those countries that have submitted know-your-customer rules and those rules have been approved.The QI agreement contains an attachment that lists the specific types of know-your-customer documentary evidence for each country that is sufficient for purposes of the QI.  The IRS is working together with the organizations that have submitted acceptable know-your-customer rules to develop standardized attachments.  The attachments can be seen here as soon as they are available.

If a country is on the approved list, entities and branches located in that country may submit their QI applications. Once a specific attachment has been developed for a particular country, the IRS will associate the attachment with the QI agreement it sends for signature. A QI may suggest amendments to the attachment, but departures from the standardized attachment may delay processing of an application.

To determine whether the know-your-customer rules that have been submitted to the IRS cover a particular QI applicant, the applicant should look to the specific country attachment. For example, in some countries, different rules apply to banks and brokers. A QI applicant that is a bank or a broker should verify that the know-your-customer rules that have been submitted cover all the rules applicable to that applicant.

For a list of countries, follow this URL: http://www.irs.gov/businesses/international/article/0,,id=96618,00.html

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CRA Tax Question: T5008. Divorce. Court Order.

In the process of managing the processing of 2 million tax slips for my employer, the world’s largest transfer agent, the following question came across my desk:

A husband and wife divorced during the year and the husband did not make his child support payments as required by court order.  As a result, family court here in Canada passed a judgement stating that any stock he held be removed from his name and either cashed in so those funds could be given to his wife, or the stock be transferred to his wife so that she may cash them in as she needs them.

So here is the question:

Who gets the T5008?  Him or her?

Note:  Traders or dealers in securities have to file a T5008 information return to report purchases of securities as principal for their own account, and sales of securities they make as an agent or nominee, for any vendor.

Issuers of securities and their agents or nominees use this (T5008) information return to report redemptions, acquisitions, or cancellations of securities.

Might this be considered a deemed disposition?

Deemed dispositions

You do not have to report deemed dispositions on a T5008 slip, in certain circumstances, the Income Tax Act considers that a property has been disposed of, even though no real compensation in the form of money or other consideration has been received.

Some examples of when a deemed disposition may occur are:

  • transfers of property to a trust;
  • gifts of property (that is, the name of the beneficial owner of the property is changed);
  • the owner dies; or
  • the owner ceases to be a resident of Canada.

In this guide, “sale” generally refers to a transaction where the ownership of property is transferred from one person or entity to another for a sum of money or other consideration. In the case of a deemed disposition, ownership of the property is not transferred for money or other consideration. In addition, a deemed disposition is not a purchase, redemption or cancellation of a security. Consequently, a deemed disposition is not considered for the purposes of Income Tax Regulation 230 and a T5008 slip is not required.

Answer to follow…

In-TAX-icating

In-TAX-icating.

Definition:

a: To excite or stupefy by taxation to the point where physical and mental control is markedly diminished

b: to excite or elate to the point of enthusiasm or frenzy… about taxation.

Passionate about Taxation.  Passionate about helping you!