CRA Tax Auditors Target Condo Sellers in Hunt for Flippers – Nothing New!

We, at inTAXicating, came across an article this morning in the Toronto Star newspaper entitled; “Tax Auditors Target Condo Sellers in Hunt for Flippers“, and immediately read through looking for something new or developing in the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) battle to tax those who should be taxed on taxable transactions.

But there was nothing new here.  While the article does, however, get a very important message across in a somewhat alarming and shocking manner probably meant to draw the attention of those who have no interest in taxation – the truth speaks for itself.

Capital Gains tax or proof, please.
Capital Gains tax or proof, please.

CRA auditors have always been looking at condo sellers and house sellers to determine who are flipping these properties for profit,  If they are, then they have to pay a capital gains tax on the profit they make during the flip.  If they hide it and are found out, then they have to pay the capital gains tax on the flip, plus they get required to pay a penalty plus interest.

For those of you who are unaware of what the article said, it essentially outlined that there are citizens who were not aware that if they buy a property and sell it within 6 months, or if they buy it but never move into it and sell it. they are liable to be taxed by the CRA, in what a Toronto tax lawyer referred to as “abusive audit practices” by the CRA.

The article seems to focus on the fact that the CRA audit group are reviewing condo sales in the two hottest markets – Toronto and Vancouver – for instances where a flip was evident and in doing so are trying to find the truth.  To do that, the CRA follows their usual practices which means some people get phone calls, some get letters, some legal warning letters and some just get assessed.  In the Canadian tax system, the burden of proof is on the taxpayer, so in this case they would have to prove (or explain) why they should not be subjected to a capital gains tax when all evidence points to it being owed.

At issue here is that there are some people who were forced to sell within that 6-month window due to circumstances beyond their control and they have been hit with a massive tax bill – or in the most recent case I successfully defended, a letter from the CRA real estate audit group indicating that the CRA would assess unless other information was provided.

From the article, even the Toronto Real Estate Board (TREB) stated; “the rules are generally clear on the amount of time one has to occupy a unit (as a principal residence) to benefit from a capital gains exemption.”

So what is the problem?

According to this article, the law does not stipulate a specific amount of time so people have been receiving assessments “for at least 50 per cent of any gains made if they’ve sold before living in the property 18 months to two years.”  An assessment like that, I would certainly challenge!

The CRA, however, through their spokesman Sam Papadopoulos, said; “We’ve just been a little more aggressive in sending out questionnaires.”

In addition to keeping an eye on capital gains, the CRA also are seeing an increase in GST/HST housing rebates being claimed, so if a letter is sent your way regarding missing information, it is advisable to provide the information to the CRA, or seek professional help, such as the Tax professionals at Intaxicating Tax Services to make sure the CRA is comfortable with the information provided and that your interests are represented throughout the discussions.

While I would not agree that this is a “full frontal attack on everybody out there who has bought and sold a property”, I would recommend anyone who received a questionnaire or an assessment notice from the CRA but do not fall in the 6-month window, or who were required to sell for reasons beyond their control, to contact us, because we can help.

Recently, we helped out a former Live-in caregiver who came to Canada almost 20 years ago, and worked 2 jobs to buy her dream home.  She purchased a condo which was scheduled to be built in 15 months, and when her floor was ready, she moved in.  When tragedy struck her family back home, she was required to sell the condo and send home money to help her family.

To add insult to injury, the CRA sent her a bill for $45,000.

She had no idea such a tax existed and was an emotional wreck at the time we met.

After 2 weeks of discussions and negotiations with the CRA auditor (some of which surrounded our clients actual ability to pay for a condo based on her income of $350/yr – the auditor was reading the educational expenses, not the income field) our client received a letter from the CRA stating that the CRA would not be raising the assessment.

Problem solved.

So no matter what tips or tricks, or techniques the CRA utilizes, the approach is consistent;  If you have the facts, and you can support them, then do so.  If the CRA disputes your facts, then you can file an objection and you can present your case to an appeals officer.

If you have questions, or don’t know something, then ask.

Contact us today for a free consultation, or to help you resolve your tax problem(s) once and for all.

inTAXicating Tax Services is a full-service boutique tax firm run by actual former CRA staff who over a combined 22 years have learned, applied and taught other CRA staff about the ins and outs of the CRA’s collection and enforcement divisions.

Who better to trust that the people who trained the CRA on how to do their jobs!

Our website is http://www.intaxicating.ca.  Our blog can be found on our website, and here, at http://www.intaxicating.wordpress.com

We can be found on Facebook here, and on Twitter, here.

Our email is info@intaxicating.ca

 

June 15th Unincorporated Filing Deadline (Canada) is Fast Approaching, Plus Year-Round Tax Tips!

The chaos and stress that comes with tax filing season in Canada has ended for most of us unless you are operating a sole proprietorship or partnership because you have until June 15th, 2013 to file your income tax (T1) return.  Any amounts owing to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) were due to the CRA by April 30th, but you have the extra month-and-a-half to file the information return, so don’t be late.

In addition, June 15th falls on a Saturday this year, so the actual return is due in the hands of the CRA by midnight on Monday June 17th.  Mailing it on the 14th is not the best option, so if you are waiting until that weekend to complete the return, I strongly recommend that you walk it into the closest CRA Tax Services Office at get it stamped with the 17th on it, or courier it to a tax centre to ensure it arrives on the due date.

If in completing the return you now find out that you actually owe(d) the CRA money, you need to pay that amount in full.  If paying it in full is not an option, then send in the amount you can best afford, and contact the CRA to make a payment arrangement on the remainder.  If doing that is not an option or if you have been carrying a balance with the CRA and this return is going to add to that balance then you have a tax problem and you are likely going to need professional help to keep enforcement actions at bay.

The CRA charges interest daily, beginning the day after taxes were due and a late-filing penalty of 5% of your balance owing plus 1% of your balance owing for each month your tax return is late, for a maximum of 12 months.   Once you caught up in the web of CRA collections and enforcement it can be very difficult to get out.  The collectors are not going to advise you how to best handle your affairs.  For the most part, then don’t understand how businesses operate, let alone your business and all they want is full payment in order to close their file.

It is in your best interest to resolve these tax matters as soon as possible, before penalties are charged and interest accumulates.  Accepting these extra fees in hope that the Taxpayer Relief Program is going to grant you relief is not a wise bet to make.

At Intaxicating Tax Services, we have seen all types of tax problems over the 17-years we’ve been helping taxpayers resolve their tax issues with the Canada Revenue Agency.  As a former Collections officer, Enforcement officer, Complex Case Officer and Team Leader I have personally handled files with every level of complexity, and all revenue types, and have recommended the same course of action for all of them – Find someone trustworthy, who knows the way CRA collections operate and leverage that expertise to get out of this mess once and for all.

If negotiating a payment plan with the Canada Revenue Agency was easy and without risk, there would be no need for Collections staff at the CRA.  The truth is, it can be very difficult to work out a payment plan with the Canada Revenue Agency while making sure that you do not give them any collection sources that they do not already have, so they can secure their liability at your expense.

Don’t let them take advantage of your good will.

Intaxicating Tax Services can help you with this!

Here are some tax facts to keep in mind as your prepare you finances for the 2013 tax filing season.

13. Contrary to popular belief the top 10% of Canadian earners pay half of all personal income taxes, while the half of earners with the lowest income pay less than a tenth (1/10th) of the total.  These high income earners keep the economy moving by having money to spend and by actually spending it.  It is this reason why those in the highest tax brackets need (and can afford) to best lawyers, accountants and tax experts, as they are already well into planning for their tax returns for 2013 and beyond.  They DO have some choice as to how much they want to spend and how much they plan to save.  All Canadians have this choice too.  By spending less, we pay less consumption taxes (GST/HST/PST), if we downsize our homes or live outside of metropolitan areas we can reduce or pay less property taxes, if we walk, cycle or carpool more, we pay less gasoline taxes, and if we are more organized and smarter with how much money we spend in total, we pay less bank fees, late fees, interest on credit cards, etc.  Everyone, not matter their income has to be smart with their money.  Paying penalties and interest to the CRA is NOT a smart way to handle our money.

12. Regardless of where you are and what you do, you really should file a tax return.  Canadian reporting is voluntary in certain conditions, but be sure you are exempted before you pass on filing.  The CRA provides details as to when you need to file and why you should file right here.

11. You have the option to defer the paying of taxes, in some cases, when you save for retirement inside a RRSP / IRA or any other form of registered retirement savings plan.  In these plans, you defer payment of income taxes until later in life. There are taxes assessed when you withdraw the money, after you have reached a certain age but those tax rates are probably lower than you would be paying now, if you have above-average income.  If your income is below average, you may be better off to pay taxes now and save in a tax-free savings account (TFSA).  If you save for your family inside a registered education savings plan or a registered disability savings plan, there will be a deferral of taxes on interest earnings, other investment returns and government grants.  Then the child or other relative for whom the plan was set up for, will likely pay little or no taxes on those savings.

10. Before you file make sure you have all your slips – it’s best to have a place where they can go throughout the year, and periodically, you should take them out, write on them what they were for and keep them all together at time of filing.   Amending tax returns is a long, tedious process, plus having to search the house or business for these slips one day before filing deadline can be extremely stressful.

9.  Make sure the government has correct information for you – address, name, direct deposit (if you never owe money) because you want your refund and if they audit you, they might not be re-assessing you, but rather they may be looking for an additional copy of a receipt they lost in the processing of 20 million tax returns.   If they do not have a correct address and they need information or something gets lost along the way and a balance arises, they will take it from your bank account or freeze that account until they get all your information – but now you are in collections…

8.  Do not ignore government mail.  Open it and action it.

7.  File electronically – but keep your receipts handy for audit and verification purposes.  It is the quickest way to file, and you may even get your refund quicker.   As an added bonus, you are also being environmentally responsible and saving trees.

6.  If you owe money, make sure that you address it properly.  Do not write a note and attach it to your return – those notes get tossed during the mass-processing cycle – but instead, contact the government and make a payment arrangement and honor it.   Anything you attach to your return – even if it is written with a glitter pen (don’t laugh, I have received MANY letters written this way during my time at the CRA) comes into the processing centres, the processors, who are usually temporary hires to help the CRA get through the tax season, rip of cheques and process that right away, then tear off any unnecessary paperwork and send the returns to a data processing group.  Anything not a return or money gets shredded.

5.  Think before you complain.  Paying taxes means your earned more money than you had to pay out.  Good for you.  As well, a third of all income in Canada is paid in taxes, which may seem really high, but before you consider moving out of the country, consider that the Canadian tax burden is less than that of 19 other developed nations. We, as Canadians only pay more taxes than 10 developed nations.

4.  Ever wonder what the CRA does with the tax money they collect?  Well, the Minister of National Revenue uses 62% of it to pay for health care, education and social assistance, including unemployment benefits.  The other 38% goes for everything else we need, like infrastructure, social programs, etc.

3.  Not everything in Canada is taxed, and here are some prime examples; There is no tax on a winning Lottery tickets, on scholarships, inheritances, gifts, the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) to the taxable Old Age Security (OAS) pension, Canada Child Tax Benefit cheques or child support payments after a divorce. You pay no tax on at least the first $9,000 of waged earnings or $40,000 of income per year if you receive only eligible corporate dividends and $18,000 if you receive only capital gains.

2.  On the flip side, there are some high-tax items, some you can make the choice to avoid, and one you might accept regardless of the amount of tax owing; The Federal income tax rate on income greater than $135,054 a year in 2012 is 29%, plus Provincial tax rates which bounce between 10%-21% based on the Province.  Taxes on cigarettes in Ontario was 63.5%; alcohol, 52.7%; and regular gasoline 39.47%.

1.  Tax relief opportunities are available, but you need to either research them or ask an expert how to qualify and what they are.  For example, there are tax breaks and benefits for those who better themselves, or the economy through getting a higher education, earning high grades, raising children, moving closer to a job, belonging to a professional group or organization, taking public transit, making charitable and political donations, investing in companies, starting a small business, and saving for retirement.   We all have the opportunity to save money, pay less tax and help ourselves and others in the future, but whatever you choose to do today, or tomorrow it’s never too late to make a change for the better.

Start today.  Stop paying the government late filing penalties, or penalties for missing installments.  Stop paying the government interest at 10% and don’t be afraid to open that brown envelope.  If you have a tax problem, we  can help.  We understand how these can spin out of control and we certainly do not judge.  With 17-years of actual tax expertise, 11 of them in the CRA, why would you trust anyone else?

Call today for a free consultation.

The Minister of National Revenue can have your tax dollars to run the country.  All Canadians thank you for that.

You don’t need to pay them penalties and interest.  You do not want to know that the CRA do with the penalties and interest money it collects!

Lien on Me: The CRA and Liens. Questions Answered.

When the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) registers a lien against your home, they are securing their interest by attaching the repayment of their debt to your property.

CDAHQsignage2

The CRA considers a lien to be enforcement action and this tool is commonly applied where there are properties in the name of a taxpayer who has a tax debt.  Collection officers at the CRA should be registering liens, or securing the Crown’s interest, much more frequently then they currently are, and it should be done whenever there is a tax debt of a considerable amount owing.

Below are some answers to common questions about CRA property liens to help you understand what to do, and where to turn for help.

1.  How to tell if there is a lien registered against your property 

A title search on your property will reveal the existence of a lien.

It is CRA policy that they advise you by letter when a Certificate has been registered in Federal Court which identifies the property in question and the balance owing for which they are preparing to register a lien.  This does not mean that a lien has been registered, but this is essentially a warning of impending action.

If, however, the CRA does not have your correct address you will not receive any notices and thus may only discover there’s a lien when you try to sell or refinance your property.  A title search reveals the existence of liens.

2.  When the CRA registers a Certificate do they always then register a lien?

Not necessarily.  The CRA could be using the Certificate in several ways, including; to secure their interest in the property to make sure that before the tax debtors interest in the property is liquidated, the tax debt is paid in full, or in order to get the attention of the property owner so they will begin negotiations with the CRA, or they may have the intention of proceeding with the seizure and sale of the property in order to pay off all or part of a tax liability.

3.  Will the CRA take my house and leave me homeless?

It is CRA policy to not seize and sell a property when it would result in the property owner having nowhere to live.  If this property is an income property or cottage or secondary place to live, then the CRA will likely proceed to realize on the property and pay off their debts.

4.  Have I lost title to my home?

No. A lien is a registration on the title of that property which prevents you from selling or refinancing that property until either the tax debt owing is paid in full, or there is a written arrangement to have the proceeds from a sale or refinancing directed to the CRA for full payment of the debt.

5.  What is a Writ of Fi Fa / Writ of Seizure and Sale?

If a Certificate has been registered in the Federal Court and the tax balance still exists, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) will register a Writ of Fi Fa (abbreviation of “fieri facias” which is Latin and means “that you cause to be made”).  It is a writ of execution obtained in legal action which is addressed to the sheriff and commands him to, in this case, seize and sell, the property of the person against whom the judgement has been obtained.

This is a very serious enforcement action and after your property is sold, you are entitled to any proceeds left over after the tax arrears have been paid in full.

6.  What are my options now that a Certificate has been registered and a lien applied to the property?

Even though the CRA has an interest in the property, you can still access the equity and use that equity to make arrangements with the CRA – or the Department of Justice – to refinance the property or even sell it with the understanding that this can only be done in conjunction with the CRA receiving full payment of their tax debt.

7.  What is the CRA’s priority regarding my property should I decide to sell it?

Assuming your mortgage is a traditional mortgage through a recognized financial institution, the proceeds from a sale should fall in this order (depending on the type of tax(es) owing);

1. Financial institution holding the mortgage

2. Secured lenders

3. Canada Revenue Agency

4. Other creditors who have registrations against the property

5. Property owner.

So if you have other debts including a tax liability (and the two tend to go hand-in-hand), then it is possible in this scenario to have nothing left over by the time the property is sold and all debtors are paid off.

8.  What if I owe CRA more than there they get from the sale of my property?

If, after the sale of your property there are still taxes owing to the CRA, them your tax balance is reduced by the amount the CRA is paid and the remainder is still owing to the CRA.

9.  What if I am not the only one on title – ie/ jointly with a spouse?  

In the case where there are more than one person on title in addition to you, it’s important to keep in mind that the CRA can only realize proceeds from your share of the equity in the property.  So if you sell, re-finance or are forced to sell, only your share of the equity can be paid out the CRA. The CRA cannot seize your spouses’, or anyone else’s equity.

Keep in mind that in order to get the Certificate, the CRA has to reconcile the account, determine the share owned by the tax debtor and then use that figure when sending the Sheriff out to seize and sell the property.

10.  The CRA has registered a lien against my property.  Can I sell my interest to someone else and get removed off title?

If a tax debtor initiates a transaction which puts an asset out of reach of the Canada Revenue Agency not at Fair Market Value, the CRA has the ability to initiate a section 160 Non-Arms Length assessment and assess the person(s) who received the asset for your liability (minus consideration received).  

11.  Will bankruptcy free me of a lien?

Filing for bankruptcy, or filing a consumer proposal, does not discharge a lien against your property. If you go bankrupt on your CRA debt, the lien remains and – even worse – accrues interest over time. Even after your discharge from bankruptcy, the lien remains in force, until you eventually sell your home and the CRA’s priority is now second in line after the bank.

If after all that the tax debt is still remaining, then and only then because of the bankruptcy, will the tax debt no longer be owing.

Who Can Help?

The bottom line here is that tax liens can cause serious problems and it’s best to seek our help to resolve your tax issues before it gets that far.  Even if a lien is in place in order to secure the Crown’s interest, it’s best not to ignore the CRA.

We have handled hundreds of liens, and will find the best solution for you.  It might be refinancing your mortgage, paying out the lien, or temporarily lifting the lien in order to improve your arrangement with the CRA.  Whatever the problem, no matter how complex, we have helped and can help.

Initial consultations are always free.

inTAXicating Tax Services.

Visit our website or send us an email at info@intaxicating.ca.

Toronto-based.  Canada-wide.

 

What keeps me busy during the day…

I like taxation, and I have worked in the industry for over 17 years, and no, I am not a CA / CMA / CGA… Yet.  I did not wake up one day deciding this was my passion, but after almost 11 years at the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), I certainly have learned a thing or two about Canadian taxation, and in the private sector afterwards I learned a thing or two about US tax, the MRQ and I had the opportunity to manage staff on a permanent basis and test out those MBA skills I worked so hard to learn.

Now I get to help people solve their tax problems and that is what makes me happy.

Here is a little biography about myself and my work-experience;

I graduated from University here in Toronto with a specialized honours degree in Public Policy and Administration.  The economy was in a downturn so I began to sell promotional items which I would customize for clients, such as; Pens, mugs, sports uniforms, etc. and I did that for just over a year-and-a-half until I applied to the CRA at the suggestion of a friend.  Seven months, later and I was settling in for my first day of training.  I will never forget the horror of walking through the office and seeing one fellow sleeping at his desk and another doing the crossword…  Little did I know what would come next.  The CRA, or maybe all governments, are unique in many ways.  They have goals, they have mandates and they have unions.  The fact that someone was resting had no bearing on the amount of work they accomplished, or how much they knew.  I certainly learned that you cannot judge a book by it’s cover.

11 months in to a job working in Collections, I was part of the most recent hiring group which was let go due to budget issues, however we were entitled to write entry exams allowing us to be re-ranked for potential re-hire.  I wrote all the exams, completed the interview and was ranked 1st, meaning if the CRA decided to hire anyone from that list, they would have to offer me a position first, and sure enough they did.

The next 10 years was a giant blur of exams, coffee breaks, crosswords and discussion about the amount of work which needed to get done vs. the amount of work allowable under the union guidelines.  For the most part this was never an issue.  During my time there I moved from an entry-level collector to a field officer and then to a resource officer and I touched a lot of areas during my time there including; compliance, GST/HST, Taxpayer relief (then fairness), Director’s Liability, Audit, Training and Learning, and so much more.  I also completed 3 years of accounting towards a CGA/CMA and my MBA degree.  I took 2 parental leaves and I worked with management to set up a collections conference and a mentoring program which I ran for 2 years.  I also performed a ton of training for all of the new hires and the rest of the staff.  I found I had an ability to take legislation and break it down into English and explain it to everyone, which helped with training and resolving complex issues.

I found treating staff as resources got the most of them and I was afforded many opportunities to manage teams within my areas.  I also found that by picking up the phone and speaking to the so-called debtors, that I could get across to people who owed the CRA money and explain what steps the CRA would be taking and use that to discuss what was in their best interests and what was in the best interests of the CRA.  As a result, I closed a lot of files without having to take any legal or enforcement actions other than talking to them.   “How would you like to resolve this?” was / and still is, a very acceptable opening line.  No accusations, and no blaming.  When I needed to flex my muscles to get something done, I certainly did just that and when push came to shove if I needed something done that was being delayed I found ways to get it done faster, or I learned it myself and taught others how to do it.

I was awarded the CRA Employee of the Year one year for my work in the office and my extracurricular work (volunteering and course-work) and as you could expect, I was quickly realizing that I was wearing out my welcome there.  I needed a change.

So just before 11 years at the CRA, I threw my resume online and I was hired by the world’s largest transfer agent to run their investor tax reporting department which I happily did for 4 years.  In this role, I learned about investor slips, T4’s, T5’s, T3’s, T5008’s, and the US forms, W8’s, W9’s, 1099B’s, and got my feet wet with Cost Basis and FATCA.  I also had a brief dive into Qualified Intermediaries, but thankfully that nightmare was moved off to compliance and legal.

While working there, I was plucked away for an opportunity as an AVP at a bank which afforded me an opportunity to dive deep into FATCA and the mutual fund side of tax reporting; Contribution receipts, T3’s, and the like.

When that opportunity ended, I was asked to work as a consultant, leading FATCA for the bank, but from somewhere down near Dallas, Texas but I decided to remain here in Toronto and I’m glad that I did.

In case you were not aware, there was a recent study published – which for the life of me I cannot find right now – which revealed that 55% of all bankruptcies in Canada were due to the Canada Revenue Agency (amounts owing / collection / enforcement actions).  That tells me that there a LOT of Canadians with tax problems and many who have tax problems but don’t know they have tax problems because they never open the brown CRA envelopes.

Now, on to my current role:

As the Managing Director of a professional tax firm committed to helping Canadians who have tax problems resolve their matters with the CRA, I have the opportunity to do what I like doing the most – helping others.  In doing this, I also help the CRA resolve some of their most complex accounts and I help people get their debt in order and their tax accounts current and up-to-date.  The management team are incredibly knowledgable about the industry and my colleagues, peers and staff are second to none.  It’s a good fit all around.

Since I have taken over this role, I have met with, and spoken to, many Canadians across the country about their tax problems and together we have worked to help them become debt-free and resolve their CRA problems so they can go back to being able to sleep at night.  I am happy to help you or someone you know.

It’s amazing what all that CRA knowledge in so many different areas can do to move a file forward.

Did you know the MRQ (Revenu Quebec) has an office in Toronto?

Did you know that The Secrétariat aux Affaires Intergouvernementales Canadiennes had an office in Toronto?  So does Revenu Quebec…

The Secrétariat advises the Government of Québec on all Canadian intergovernmental matters, coordinates Québec government activities in Canada, assures the defence and promotion of Québec’s interests, and collaborates to strengthen links with Canada’s francophone and Acadian communities.

The mandate of this office which opened in 1973, is to promote and safeguard Québec’s interests in Ontario, Manitoba and Nunavut. The head of the Bureau du Québec à Toronto represents the Québec government in its relations with these three governments and is also in charge of Québec’s Vancouver branch office, which is mandated to maintain relations with the governments of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories.

Contact information

Bureau du Québec à Toronto
20 Queen Street West, Suite 1504
P.O. Box 13
Toronto, Ontario M5H 3S3

Telephone: 416 977-6060
Fax: 416 596-1407
E-mail: bqtoronto@mce.gouv.qc.ca

Head: Paul-Arthur Huot

Intergovernmental and institutional relations

One of the main tasks of the Toronto office is to maintain and develop Québec’s intergovernmental and institutional relations with Ontario, Manitoba and Nunavut and facilitate exchanges with them. To that end, the office plays an active, ongoing liaison role with government and public departments and agencies such as universities, colleges and municipalities.

Economy

The office’s solid market expertise enables it to offer a wide range of economic and commercial consultation services to Québec businesses. It also promotes Québec products. Thus, the office:

  • supports Québec businesses seeking to penetrate the Ontario and Manitoba markets;
  • advises businesses in its territory looking to invest in Québec or market their products there;
  • provides services proper to the regional economic context;
  • bolsters business partnerships.

Culture

The office fosters an ongoing dialogue with the artists of Ontario and Manitoba to promote exchanges and develop a network for disseminating the work of Québec artists. Its activities are also aimed at promoting Québec’s cultural works and informing the people of Ontario and Manitoba on Québec culture.

Francophonie

The Office nurtures privileged ties with the Francophone organizations that are present on the territory it covers, thus fostering exchanges and partnerships between the Francophone representatives of these regions and Québec. It plays an active role in managing the programs arising out of the Québec Policy on the Canadian Francophonie, and in monitoring the various cooperation agreements.

E-mail: bqtoronto@mce.gouv.qc.ca

In the “Francophonie” section of its Website, the Secrétariat aux affaires intergouvernementales canadiennes offers useful information concerning the policy’s implementation and available financial assistance pursuant to the policy

Communications and public affairs

The Toronto office represents and promotes Québec. It informs Québec government authorities of the major political and economic issues in its territory. Hence, it:

  • provides information and documentation on Québec;
  • maintains relations with the national press;
  • makes a daily survey of major events in its territory;
  • informs Québec government authorities of, and advises them on, the major political, economic and social issues in Ontario and Manitoba.

 

UPDATE:

Taxation

The ministère du Revenu du Québec (or MRQ) has a team of tax specialists in Toronto who USED to be located in the Bureau du Québec à Toronto, to carry out the necessary verifications concerning Canadian firms that do business in Québec, however, they have moved!

The new Toronto office offers taxpayers and agents a tax information telephone service. It also makes available a complete inventory of tax forms.

As of December 2014, their office moved, and is now located at:

400 University Avenue, Suite 1500.

Toronto, ON M5G 1S7

 

Documents may be dropped off at this address between 8 am – 12 pm, and 1 -4 pm.

There is a drop box!

The new telephone number for Revenu Québec in Toronto is: 416.645.8770 x 645 4000

The new office sent me a note to update the information – and I thank them – but they state that with the awesome Clic Revenue Service they offer online, it is very rare that the general public would need to contact them.  I agree.

Ms. Nicole Lemieux is now the Chief Representative.

The MRQ office email: saic-bqtrev@mce.gouv.qc.ca

 

For further information on the Bureau du Québec à Toronto, feel free to contact the office’s personnel.

E-mail: bqtoronto@mce.gouv.qc.ca

http://www.saic.gouv.qc.ca/bureauduquebec/bureau_quebec_toronto_en.htm

Now that’s service!

Government Waste Awards give Lifetime Achievement to former Toronto Mayor David Miller

The 13th Annual “Teddy” Government Waste Awards Winners were announced by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) last week.

The CTF is a citizen advocacy group dedicated to less waste, lower taxes and responsible government spending of our hard earned dollars.

These awards confirm what I had been saying all along, that a left-wing mayor in the City of Toronto was going to cause an increase in taxes and result in less money in the pockets of Torontonions, as David Miller was given the lifetime achievement award.

Please, read on.

The “Teddy” award is named after Ted Weatherill, a former federal bureaucrat who was fired for outrageous expenses in 1999 (I’ve included his expenses below). Each year the CTF holds the ceremony to recognize a government, public office holder, civil servant, department or agency that most exemplifies government waste.

The winners:

Federal Teddy Winner:
G8/G20 costs: $1.24 billion spent to host leaders from the other G8/G20 nations to ironically discuss how to trim government over-spending.

Provincial Teddy Winner:
Ontario tax collectors paid severance for keeping jobs: Approximately $56-million in severance for changing their business cards from ‘Ontario PST collector’ to ‘Federal HST’ collector.”
These guys moved across the street from 5150 Yonge Street to 5001 Yonge street and were topped up to make up for the fact that the Feds pay less than the province.

Municipal Teddy Winner:
Edmonton City Council for wasting $5,000.00 on a haiku contest. Citizens were asked to write poems (or haikus) about riding the bus, despite already having paid $5,000 to have one written.

Lifetime Achievement Teddy:
David Miller

“And the Lifetime Achievement Teddy goes to…former Toronto Mayor, David Miller, for a career of reckless taxing-and-spending. As Mayor, Miller grew the city’s operating budget by 44 per cent, $2.8 billion, increased the city’s debt by more than $1 billion and increased property taxes every year well beyond the rate of inflation. He fought for and got new taxing powers which he used to impose a host of new taxes, including a: plastic bag tax, garbage tax, car tax, billboard tax, and land transfer tax.”

Concluding the ceremony CTF federal director, Kevin Gaudet remarked, “over the years David Miller has provided so much material for the Teddies we will see if future municipal nominations will suffer with his departure.”

Other nominees included:
Federal – Space Agency/Agriculture Canada: $400,000 for failed “Canadian Content” astronaut food program.

Federal – Border Services Agency Employee: Bureaucrat spends five hours/day at work surfing porn and is not fired.

Federal – National Defence: $515,000 for not conducting security checks on NORAD facility builders.

Federal – Public Works: $550 million for maintenance including $1,000 for removing one light switch.

Federal – Senator Lavigne: $30,000 for expenses – while suspended from the Senate.

Provincial – ON E-Health: $224M for consultant abuse including charges to consult on consulting charges.

Provincial – ON Parks: $400K for Niagara Parks Exec expenses including roller coasters.

Provincial – NS Premier Dexter: $10,600 to expense full membership fees to the bar association, then reducing status to “not practicing” when forced to pay himself.

Provincial – MB Health: $38,000 to build “rooftop oasis” for health bureaucrats while patients down the road fundraise for theirs.

Municipal – Summerside, PEI: $1.3 million for fraudulent Michael Jackson tribute concert.

Municipal – Regina, SK: $5,000 for bizarre sponsorships including $450 for a ‘pickleball tournament.’

Municipal -Richmond, BC: $59 million for city purchase of land for five-times real value to be “as fair as possible.”

Municipal – Toronto, ON: Public transit boss caught expensing $2,400 for taxis.

http://taxpayer.com/node/13985

Now, back to the name of these awards… The “Teddys”, named after Ted Weatherill who was the Chair of the Canada Labour Relations Board since 1989. Between 1995 and 1996, Mr. Weatherill charged at least $21000 to taxpayers for business travel he incurred as President of the National Academy of Arbitrators, an Alabama-based private organization.

“Mr. Weatherill concedes that he could have sent the expenses to the National Academy of Arbitrators…but Mr. Weatherill believed his participation in the NAA’s conferences that year to be a wise investment for the Canada Labour Relations Board. So, he chose to bill his expenses to the Canadian government instead.”
The Ottawa Citizen, 7 April 1997

There’s more than just travel, though. The following is a “taste” of the meals Mr. Weatherill has billed to the Canadian taxpayer over the past eight years:

Breakfast: Relais Christine, Paris $25.00
Meal (for 2): RPG Arpege, Paris $733.43
Dinner: Le Cercle Universitaire d’Ottawa $1 084.40
Room Service (one night): Chateau Frontenac, Québec City $95.27
Meal: Royal Windsor Hotel, Brussels $531.50
Mr. Weatherill billed the federal government on average $18,500 a year in meal costs alone, for a grand total of $148,000 over the first eight years of his ten year term. He has billed the federal government more that $200 for a meal on 107 different occasions since he was hired.

Many of Mr. Weatherill’s lunches have included alcoholic beverages. Treasury Board guidelines state that “reasonable expenses means the specific, itemized expenses incurred, based on receipts, excluding alcohol.”