The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Knows Who Cheats on their Taxes!

Are you on the Canada Revenue Agencies radar?  How about on the CRA’s Audit Radar?  Have you been “flagged”?

Have you ever wondered how the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) decides who to audit?  Are there red flags?  Or does the CRA know how you operate your business which makes you more or less likely to be audited?

Here is the answer that you might be looking for;

The CRA knows who Cheats on their Taxes!

Do you fit their profile?

Are you at risk?

First, some background.

While I was still working at the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), we released the results of a study that was put together to profile what kind of person poses the most risk for the CRA’s collections and audit groups.

The CRA spent a lot of time going through the main accounts; personal tax, payroll, GST/HST, and Corporate Tax, and we looked at who filed on time, who filed late (and how late they filed), and who was regularly compliant, and who needed a follow up verification audit, and what the result of those audits were.

This study focused on Tax Compliance, specifically;

  • Percentage of Taxpayers who accurately reported income and expenses (95%)
  • Percentage of Taxpayers who file on time (93%)
  • Percentage of Taxpayers who made payments on time with their filing (91%).

When it comes to reporting compliance or honestly reporting all your income and/or expenses, this study found that males are more likely to underreport their tax owing than females.

The study also found that underreporting is highest among taxpayers aged 35 to 54 and lowest among taxpayers under 35.

Underreporting of tax was also lowest for taxpayers who are married and highest for those who are separated, with single taxpayers somewhere in between.

Not surprisingly, underreporting of tax is higher among taxpayers whose main source of income is either capital gains or self-employment income versus taxpayers whose main source of income is wages, where most of the tax is withheld at source by the employer.

So who is on the CRA’s radar?

The prime candidates for the CRA to audit, or perform a desk review of expenses, are the separated or divorced males between the ages of 35-54 years old.

Do you fall into that category?

If so, know that the CRA is keeping one eye on you and the other on what you report and when it is reported.

Contact us at inTAXicating, and let us help you ensure that you remain compliant, and ensure that you have the knowledge necessary to organize your records so that you can quickly and easily get through a CRA audit.

EXAMPLE:

Here is an example of a case where the CRA used the criteria identified earlier to quickly descend on a taxpayer who fell behind in his filing and remitting duties.

Case: Tax Cheat?  Or Disorganized Business Owner?

I was approached by a business owner who ran very loosely with his books and records.  He kept a box of receipts and while most of the business receipts made the box, many got lost along the way.  Additionally, this business owner charged business expenses on his personal credit card, and personal expenses on his business card.  He travelled quite a lot for work, and he posted a lot of content on social media, but he failed to keep a thorough and accurate log documenting his personal versus business travel.

Additionally, because he was always on the go, had no time to review the details of the tax side of his business.  He had money in his business bank account, then he knew he was earning money.  At year-end, he would bring his half-completed records and his shoebox to his accountant for the preparation of his returns.

In June he would receive a refund.

A series of events, however, changed his life forever.

  1. His accountant began to get busy
  2. As a result, he was late getting payroll figures, and was late making the payroll remittance
  3. Then the GST/HST numbers were delayed, so that filing was late
  4. His personal tax filings were delayed
  5. His business tax filing was delayed.
  6. His business made money.
  7. While all of this was going on – he continued to send his info to the CA, and pay the CA’s invoices.  He would get the odd notice from the CRA and send it to his accountant to “take care of”.

This is very typical and a common occurence.

What he didn’t know was that everything was not okay.

One day a CRA field officer showed up to discuss his non-compliance and to arrange a payroll audit because the company was 6-months behind on remittances.  There was also a balance owing to the CRA of over $35,000.

Shocked, he contacted his CA who said that she would look into it, that it was going to take some time and she felt the CRA was completely wrong.

Convinced that the accountant was right, the business owner went back to work, and the accountant was going to find the error and fix the problem.

Only problem that he didn’t know was that there was no “error”.  The balance owing to the CRA was legitimate.  By filing late over that 6-month period, the accountant had amassed a significant balance due to late filing penalties and the balance was jumping by leaps and bounds as a result of the 10% interest the CRA charges on outstanding balances (compounding daily).

Then one day he received a call from one of his main suppliers who was concenred because not only did he cheque bounce, but there was a CRA officer there earlier in the day asking questions.

He contacted his accountant.

She appeared stunned and said that she would call the CRA and fix it.

She was just buying time.

A week later, the garnishment was still on the account, interest was accruing, and the accountant was telling stories of the CRA being unfair, and mean, and not listening or returning calls.

Frustrated and panicked that he might have to close his business without a bank account, he contacted his CA and asked for his books and records.

She refused.  Realizing that this was the end of the relationship with her client, she told him that she had done a lot of work with the CRA and she demanded payment before she would give up his information.

He refused to pay – how could he?  He had no access to his bank account and the CRA had taken all of his funds.

In fact, it took him 8-months and a small claims court date for this process to resolve itself.  She took him to court for unpaid work, and thankfully, the judge was wise to this CA and her practices and awarded the client his books and records in return for payment of the work actually completed, not the entire invoice.

The damage was done.  The business was also close to being done.

The CRA doesn’t care about the reasons why someone becomes non-compliant – they look at the business, the owner, and then set their course to fix it.

The fact that this business owner fit the category did not help him at all, as the CRA quickly and aggressively went after every asset that he had, raised assessments for the missing payroll and GST/HST figures, and sent Requirements to Pay to his business bank account, contacted his receivables (clients) and quickly moved to raise director’s liability so they could go after his personal assets.

Conclusion

Running a business is difficult.

Running a business without a business bank account is also difficult.

Running a business without a bank account, after the CRA notified your clients that you owe considerable amounts of tax money is next to impossible.

What killed this business was a combination of bad accounting, bad advice, lies, deception and some really bad luck.

The reality is that many, many businesses and individuals have this experience on a daily basis.  It is next to impossible for the CRA to determine if the information being told to them is legitimate or a made up story – but when the owner of the business is a perfect fit for commiting tax fraud – the CRA takes notice.

Could this have been fixed?  Of course.

If you owe money to the CRA, or if you have fallen behind on compliance, or if you suspect that your tax advisor is giving you bad advice, contact us now.  At inTAXicating, we’ll look at the facts, and help you run your business while we work on solving the problem.

Visit our website @ www.intaxicating.ca.

Send us an email to: Info@intaxicating.ca

 

 

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Former Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Auditor Not Guilty of Fraud

A former Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) auditor and his wife were found not guilty of fraud when a judge rules that the CRA failed to prove that the fraud was intentional.

This is significant, folks!

The original article can be found here;

https://www.surreynowleader.com/news/former-canada-revenue-agency-auditing-employee-and-wife-found-not-guilty-of-tax-evasion/

What I truly hope is that this ruling provides the CRA with a much clearer understanding that there are actually some Taxpayers and businesses (and even former employees) who might not fully understand the CRA’s rules and regulations and their application, and that there exists a chance that people make mistakes.

I’m not saying in this case that there was a mistake – and I don;t believe that the judge was saying that either, but what was very clear from this ruling is that the for the CRA to win a case they need proof and facts.

The CRA obviously will be appealing this decision.

My experience in the CRA has afforded me this insight which I happily pass along to each of you who read this…  It’s okay to make mistakes.  We all do.  The CRA does not expect each and every Canadian Taxpayer to be tax experts, but where the CRA has zero tolerance is where Taxpayers try to circumvent the rules and do so knowingly.  At that point, you can’t claim you didn’t know the rules.  You’ll be no mercy from the Crown at that point in time.

As well, there are many, many, many opportunities to resolve the tax issues before having to bear the expenses of going to tax court!  This ruling was the first of it’s kind, and considering how many people want to sue the CRA or take the CRA to court, it makes you wonder who is advising them, and who is paying their bills!

To understand where you stand and what your options are, you can start by contacting inTAXicating Tax Services, at http://www.intaxicating.ca, and start dealing with you tax issues with the facts.

info@intaxicating.ca

You Filed Your Tax Return to the CRA. You Owe CRA Money. Now What?

You have filed you Canadian personal tax return by the April 30th deadline and you owe the CRA money.  Now what?  You have heard horror stories about how the Canada Revenue Agency goes about collecting taxes dollars.

You need to act fast, right?

Well that is exactly what is wrong with tax-filing season in Canada.

What about if you owe more to the CRA because you already have a balance, or if you happen to be self-employed and you plan on having your tax returns prepared after the April 30th deadline, but before the June 15th deadline for self-employed Canadians, and you find out that you owe money to the CRA?

Or, what if you carry a balance year-over-year because between taxes owing and installment payments, you just can’t keep up?

What do you do?

What are your options?

If you listen to the radio, you are likely to have noticed that about every 3rd ad is a commercials talking about debt.  In these commercials, very calm voices talk about how it feels to be in debt and how they a simple solution for debt.  They even refer to “programs” which are supported or endorsed by the Canadian government. and in 10 minutes / 15 minutes / 20 minutes, you too can be debt free.

It’s convenient.  Too convenient…

Their solution is bankruptcy or a consumer proposal, and their solution is a great way for you to no longer have debt owing to the Canada Revenue Agency, or your credit card provider, etc.

What they fail to mention, is that you are paying them money to trade your debt problem for a credit problem.

Sure, you won’t owe the CRA any more, but now that the euphoria of that “win” has worn off, you now have to face reality that you have no credit for 3-7 years at best.  During that 3-7 years, you won’t have a credit card unless it’s a prepaid one, and you won’t be able to get a loan, and you cannot be the director of a corporation.

During that period where you are under a  proposal or in bankruptcy, the CRA can, and still will raise assessment where they are allowed by law to, such as raising s160/s325 assessments for assets transferred to avoid paying the CRA, or if you act as a director even though the director is someone else’s name.

Forget about it if the CRA has already placed a lien on an asset.  That survives a bankruptcy.

But the commercials make it sound SO appealing, so quick, and so good.

I’ve always felt that bankruptcy and Consumer Proposals are great options for people with no options.  If your debt is tax-related then you really should know what your options are before jumping at the first thing you hear and making these Trustee / Insolvency firms rich, so they can advertise even more, but up bigger billboards and open their own “tax solution” businesses to “help” you with your tax problems.

Don’t fall for the easy way out, because you get way more than you bargained for!

Instead, contact us, inTAXicating, and let us diagnose your debt, and tell you the best options for you, and not what works best you the trustee or the CRA.

http://www.intaxicating.ca

CRA Problems? Here is what you need to do!

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Do you have problems with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)?

Do you owe the CRA money?

Are you behind on your personal (T1) tax filings?

Are you a business owner and you have fallen behind on payroll, GST/HST or Corporate Tax (T2) returns?

Has the CRA registered a lien against a property you own?

Have you transferred and asset and the CRA is assessing a 3rd party for your debts?

Are there garnishments on you bank account or against your wages?

Do you own a business and the CRA is contemplating Director’s liability?

Is the CRA taking you to court, and you just don’t understand if you have a case or not?

Does any of this make sense to you?

It’s complicated, it’s time sensitive and it’s extremely frustrating that the CRA would rather force you, or your business into bankruptcy that work with you, isn’t it?

Here is what you need to know before you can do anything to solve these problems:

  1. If you search online using any keywords related to CRA, tax, debt, or urgency, you might wind up here (you can thank me later), or you might wind up at a trustee.  Bankruptcy firms have covered the internet with keywords aimed to make you think that the best and only option for you, is bankruptcy or a consumer proposal.  While it might be, there are SO many other options!!!  You don’t need a trustee to put you in bankruptcy in order to remove a RTP, when asking the CRA to remove it might be the way to go.
  2. Just like the phone scams claiming to be from the CRA, or wanting to clear your ducts, there are many “Tax Solutions” firms out there disguised as your ideal solution, when they want your money, your trust and then you accept their advice that bankruptcy is the best option for you.  You can identify these firms this way:
    1. They buy followers on Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts they operate.
    2. They write blog posts not intended to help you, but to scare you.
    3. They refer to the CRA as being bad, evil, and as the “Tax Man.”  That approach is proven to never work.  Even if you detest the CRA, telling them that won’t help your case.
    4. They hide their true intentions; either that they are part of a Trustee in Bankruptcy or by calling themselves fun names, to distract you from who they are and who the owners are.
  3. You need to know what the CRA wants from you, and how to go about fixing it.  If you don’t know how the debt came about or what the CRA can, will, or have done to you already, then you cannot fix it, or have someone fix it for you, and,
  4. You need to know what will happen to you / your company / your family, in the instance where you decide to; do nothing, pay the balance, file the returns, fully comply with the CRA or choose bankruptcy / consumer proposal.

Without knowing answers to the above 4 questions, you cannot properly fix your tax problems once and for all.

If the “solution” to your 5, 10, 15 or 20-year tax problem can be fixed in one meeting and for a fee, what exactly are you getting?

Tax problems that take years to establish, sometime take years to resolve.  Considering some of the alternatives, it’s worth it to know that your CRA problems have been resolved and you are not exchanging a CRA tax problem for a bankruptcy / consumer proposal problem.

Ask, before you begin.

info@intaxicating.ca

Tell us about your tax problems, and let us tell you what the best option for YOU is.  If the solution can be achieved through a simple action which you can do, then you get moving on it.

If it requires some expertise or assistance, then leave that up to us.

Former CRA Collections expertise to help you when you need it the most!

 

 

What’s New For 2018: CRA

The Filing deadline for your 2017 Personal Tax Return (T1) is April 30th, 2018.

While most Canadian income tax and benefit returns for 2017 are due on April 30, 2018, if you or your spouse or common-law partner is self-employed, you have until June 15, 2018.

You can file online as early as February 26, 2018.

Filing early ensures your benefit and credit payments are not delayed or stopped.

If you have a spouse or common-law partner, they should also file a return early.

The benefit and credit payments include (Link to CRA website included):

This year, the Canada Revenue Agency is making it easier for paper tax filers to do their taxes by mailing them their forms and guides directly.

Want your tax refund faster?

You can register for  the CRA’s direct deposit, and receive your income tax refunds and benefits quickly and securely, however, if you provide the CRA with your bank information AND fall into tax troubles, the CRA can, and will, use that bank account to freeze or seize the money in it to pay off the debt.

Additionally, there are some new changes which can impact your tax return, some of which include;

Medical Expense Tax Credit for Reproductive Expenses

The medical expense tax credit provides relief for individuals who have paid significant medical expenses for themselves or certain dependants.  This credit is non-refundable credit and is intended to reduce taxes owing.

Effective for 2017, amounts paid for reproductive technologies for the purpose of conceiving a child can be claimed as a medical expense tax credit, even if the individual does not have a medical condition preventing them from conceiving a child. Previously, the medical expense tax credit was available if the use of the reproductive technologies directly related to a medical infertility condition.

A request can be made to the Canada Revenue Agency to claim reproductive technologies expenses unclaimed in the last 10 calendar years.

Certification of Disability Tax Credit Certificate

The Disability Tax Credit program provides relief for individuals who have a severe and prolonged impairment in physical and mental functions by providing a non-refundable tax credit that can reduce taxes owing.

As of March 2017, nurse practitioners and medical doctors are allowed to certify Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate.

Federal Public Transit Credit

After June 30, 2017, amounts paid for eligible transit passes no longer qualify for a non-refundable tax credit, however, you can claim a non-refundable tax credit in your 2017 income tax and benefit return for eligible transit passes paid from January 1, 2017 to June 30, 2017.

As a result of the changes made to the Federal Public Transit Credit, the Ontario government introduced a new refundable tax credit effective July 1, 2017, and to be eligible to claim this credit, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Be 65 years of age at the beginning of the year;
  • Reside in Ontario at the end of the year; and
  • Paid for eligible transit service from July 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017 (receipts should be retained).

The maximum refundable credit that can be claimed for 2017 is $225. For subsequent years, the maximum refundable credit is $450. Visit the Canada.ca site here, for additional information.

Tuition, Education and Textbook Credit

Effective January 1, 2017, the Federal, education and textbook credits were eliminated, however, any unused credits from previous years can be carried-forward.

As a result of the 2016 Ontario Budget, changes were made to the Ontario tuition and education non-refundable tax credits. Credit is available for eligible tuition fees paid for studies before September 5, 2017. In addition, credit for the education amount is available for months of study before September 2017. Unused credits from previous years can be carried forward.

FILE

Of most importance is that you must file that tax return on time to the CRA.  If you have a habit of being late, the CRA will increase the amount of the Late Filing Penalty (LFP) year-over-year, and they multiply that percentage against the amount of taxes owing.  There is not limit to the amount of penalties which can be charged, and the most I have seen is 93%.  That is a LOT, and it’s in addition to the taxes owing!

If you need assistance with anything discussed above, or if you require more details, or have CRA debts, you can reach us at info@intaxicating.ca for your coast-to-coast CRA Collections expertise.

Visit our website, http://www.intaxicating.ca.

2018 Federal Budget Highlights: 12 Changes Related to Taxation, the CRA, and you, the Canadian Taxpayer

The Federal Liberal government has just unveiled their 3rd budget, and in doing so will be increasing spending by roughly $20 billion dollars, bringing the federal deficit to roughly $670 billion dollars.

Looking at the tax issues, here are the main items which come from the budget this afternoon;

  1. 5-Week “Take-it-or-leave-it” Paternity Leave.

The government implemented a 5-week “take it or leave it” parental leave, pretty much like what Quebec has, in order to entice more dads to take paternity leave.  This would begin June 2019 (not sure why it takes this long to implement) and the Liberals expect it to cost taxpayers $1.2 billion dollars.

What this does not do is change the corporate culture which deters dads from taking time off, nor does it entice more moms to join the workforce.

What might have helped, would be more available daycare spaces, or fixing the Live-in Caregiver program which worked very well until it didn’t.

2.  Throwing bad money after bad money – Phoenix Pay system

If you have been following the Phoenix payroll fiasco that has been going on in the CRA, you would know that the CRA has already spent a lot of money on a payroll system which didn’t work, and then a ton of money to try and fix it.

Now, the Liberals have announced that it intends to eventually move away from Phoenix and explore the “next generation of the federal government’s pay system, but before doing so, the Liberals provided $16 million over the next 2 years to “research” a new pay system.

I’ll do that on my own, for half that amount.!

While “researching,” the CRA will now have $431.4 million over 6 years to try to fix the existing Phoenix system.

When you add the hundreds of millions of dollars that the Liberal government has already invested in fixing the Phoenix pay system, and the researching costs, and the budgeted costs, you will come to a figure of roughly $900 million on a system that this government will move away from.

This system was supposed to save the government roughly $70 million per year, starting in the 2016-17 fiscal year, and the Auditor General even said that scrapping the pay system would be the worst thing the government could do because if they start from scratch, they could have the same issues with another system!

3.  Help for the CRA to answer their phones!

The Liberal government is providing $206 million over 5-years to the CRA to help the Agency answer their phones.  This issue came up in November when the Auditor General noted that the CRA’s call centre only picked up the phone about one-third of the time.

The money will be used to improve the CRA’s telephone service, improve their online services and increase the number of community-based programs which help low-income people prepare their tax forms.  Ideally the call centre hours will also be expanded, and more training will be provided to ensure that more correct answers are provided.

4.  Private Company Passive Investment Income

Beginning taxation year 2019, there will be a phasing out of access to the small business deduction for Canadian Controlled Private Corporations (CCPC’s) which earn more than $50,000 of investment income.  The current rules for the refundable tax on dividends paid by CCPCs will also be amended.

CCPC’s are entitled to a preferential tax rate on up to $500,000 of qualifying active business income – the “small business deduction.”

Going forward, CCPC’s who earn income or net capital gains from property (not properties used in an active business) will be treated as follows; For each $1 of investment income earned over $50,000, the small business deduction limit will be reduced by $5, so once a CCPC has investment income greater than $150,000, they will lose their small business deduction entirely.

The government has decided that Canadians who earn income passively, ie/ rental income, deserve to pay more tax because either;

a. It’s not fair to Canadians who have to “work” to earn income

b. The Liberals got elected taxing the “rich” and by earning money this way – damn you – you are on their list, or,

c. The Liberals would tax a tax if they could because they need tax revenue to pay for all their promises.

5. New Tax Rules for Trusts to begin in 2021.

The government needs more taxes, hence the new tax reporting requirements for trusts which were unveiled in the budget.  The intention of these new rules is to provide the CRA with information related to beneficial owners, or potential beneficial owners of trusts.

Currently, trusts which do not earn income or make distributions in a taxation year are generally not currently required to file a T3 trust return.  (Trusts are required to file T3 returns if there is tax payable in the year or if the trust distributes income or capital to its beneficiaries.)

These new rules apply to express trusts which are resident in Canada as well as to non-resident trusts currently required to file T3 returns.  Each trust will have to provide the CRA with the identity of all of its trustees, beneficiaries and settlors, as well as each person who has the ability – through the trust terms or related agreements – to exercise control over trustee decisions regarding the appointment of income or capital of the trust, such as a protector.

The budget currently grants an exemption to mutual fund trusts, segregated funds, trusts governed by registered plans, graduated rate estates and qualified disability trusts, non-profit organizations and registered charities, and certain trusts that have been in existence for less than three months or that hold less than $50,000 in specified passive assets.

6. Tiered Partnerships Losses and At-Risk Rules

Essentially, partnerships wanted to use losses from one partner to lower the income of another partner, but the CRA disagreed.  The matter went to court and the CRA lost.  This budget reverses the CRA’s loss, making it a win, and worse than that, it is effective the date of the budget, which was February 27, 2018.  Losses are now lost.

7. Increased Assessment Period for CRA on Foreign Interests

Effective February 27, 2018, the CRA will have an extended reassessment period of taxpayers in respect of income arising in connection with foreign corporations in which they have at least a 10% interest in because it’s a long, often difficult process for the CRA to audit these foreign affiliates.

8. Reduced Filing Deadline to 6 Months for T1134.

Effective 2020, Taxpayers who currently had 15-months to file Form T1134, now have 6-months to do so.

9. Fighting Aggressive International Tax Avoidance

The Liberal government committed to fight international tax avoidance by strengthening rules related to controlled foreign corporations, addressing issues of treaty abuse, adopting the OECD revised Transfer Pricing Guidelines, and of greatest significance is the pledge to abide by tax reporting requirements of countries which Canada bilateral exchange agreements – and providing information to the tax authorities of these countries.

The acceptance of the OECD multilateral competent authority agreement now increases the countries which Canada can provide information to, and get information from.

Additionally, the CRA will be able to participate in what was called a “spontaneous exchange of information” on certain tax rulings with other tax administrations as part of a coordinated international effort to counter harmful tax practices.

The CRA also gets $38.7 million to expand its offshore compliance activities through the use of improved risk assessment systems and business intelligence, and to facilitate the hiring of additional auditors.

The anticipation is that the CRA will need these auditors to act on the new information they will be receiving as a part of the OECD/G20 Common Reporting Standard participation.

Another key tax issue relates to reassessment periods and non-residents of Canada to address a scenario where the CRA reassesses a taxpayer in order to reduce or eliminate a loss in a taxation year which results from a non-arm’s length transaction with a non-resident.  Currently, the CRA cannot reassess the taxation year to which that loss was carried back because the reassessment period has elapsed, but going forward, the CRA will have 6 years after the normal reassessment period to reassess the year to which the loss was carried back in such circumstances.

Another change impacts a scenario where a taxpayer contests a requirement for information (RFI) or an application for a compliance order – as this period will not be included when computing the time limit for the CRA to reassess.

This “stop-the-clock” rule is similar to the existing rule that applies for purposes of requirements for foreign-based information.

10. GST/HST

GST/HST is applicable on the fair market value of the management and administrative services provided by the general partner to an investment limited partnership where consideration becomes due or is paid before September 8, 2017.

GST/HST now applies to management and administrative services rendered by the general partner on or after September 8, 2017, unless GST/HST was charged by the general partner before that date.

The GST/HST is generally payable on the fair market value of management and administrative services in the tax year in which these services are rendered (however rules to calculate FMV, and what constitutes FMV were not provided at this time).

11. Excise – Cannabis Tax

A new excise duty framework for cannabis products under the Excise Act, 2001 applies to all products available for legal purchase, including fresh and dried cannabis, cannabis oils, and seeds and seedlings for home cultivation.

The cannabis taxation program will be administered by the federal government on behalf of most provincial and territorial governments on a coordinated basis. 75% of the taxation revenues from a combined $1 per gram / 10% of the price of the product, whichever is higher, excise duty rate will flow to participating provinces and territories, with the federal government receiving the remaining 25%.

12. Increased Funding to CRA and Tax Court of Canada

The budget provided money to the CRA and the Tax Court of Canada to:

  • $79 million over 5 years and then $15 million per year going forward in order to develop an electronic platform for processing trust returns;
  • $90.6 million over 5-years to help the CRA pursue domestic and international cases which have been identified as high-risk potential danger of loss through enhanced risk assessment systems;
  • $30 million over 5-years to enhance security measures aimed at better protecting the confidentiality of taxpayer information; and
  • $41.9 million over 5-year, and $9.3 million annually going forward to provide support for new front-line registry and judicial staff, most of whom are expected to support the Tax Court of Canada.

And so much more…

 

CRA: Cannabis Taxation at a Glance

Beginning likely in 2020, the Government of Canada will begin to legalize, regulate, restrict and tax cannabis to keep it out of the hands of kids, and profits out of the hands of criminals.

The Government of Canada believes that the total of federal and provincial-territorial taxes on cannabis products should not exceed $1.00 per gram, or 10% of the producer’s sale price of a product, and that this tax room should be shared equally between the Federal government and the Provincial government.

The proposed federal excise duty rate would be 50 cents per gram of cannabis, or 5% of the producer’s sale price of that product.

An additional rate would apply for an agreeing province or territory.

The proposed duty would apply to all cannabis products available for legal sale, including fresh and dried cannabis, cannabis oils, as well as seeds and seedlings for home cultivation.

The rate will also apply to the sale of medical cannabis.

It is important to note that excise duties are not paid directly by consumers. Rather, they are paid by manufacturers.

Cannabis product sales will be taxable under the Goods and Services Tax/Harmonized Sales Tax (GST/HST), as is currently the case for medical cannabis, for example.

The following example, provided by the government of Canada, illustrates the final price paid by consumers at a combined rate of $1.00 per gram, or 10% of the sale price:

One gram of dried cannabis

Pre-duty price: $8.00

Excise duty (per gram): $1.00

Subtotal: $9.00

GST/HST: $1.17

Total: $10.17

60 ml bottle of cannabis oil

Pre-duty price: $130.00

Excise duty (%): $13.00

Subtotal: $143.00

GST/HST: $18.59

Total: $161.59